Budget 2014: Who were the big winners?

Savers, businesses and drinkers win big in this year's Budget

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Budget 2014

As well as a new pound coin in the shape of an old thruppenny bit, the Budget included the unveiling or confirmation of a number of measures that should make life easier for savers and working parents, among others.

Here, we take a closer look at this year's big winners.


Savers
"Support for savers is at the centre of this Budget," the Chancellor said at the start of his speech. And he did not disappoint.

The biggest surprise was a revamp for tax-efficient individual savings accounts (ISAs), with the existing cash and stocks and shares accounts being merged and the annual limit being raised to £15,000.

This is up from a planned limit of £11,880 - including up to £5,940 in a cash ISA - and will mean that savers keen to avoid risk can invest up to the full amount in a savings account.

However, older savers will also be pleased to learnt that the government is planning to launch a new pensioner bond available to anyone aged over 65 and expected to offer rates of around 4% over three years.

Drinkers
In another surprise move, the Chancellor announced today that he was scrapping the alcohol duty escalator, which adds inflation plus at least 2% to the price of alcoholic drinks.

He also said that he would be cutting the price of a pint of beer by 1p as he did last year, and that duty on whiskey and ordinary cider would be frozen this year.

Bingo halls
The Chancellor told MPs that the number of bingo halls in the UK had "plummeted" by three quarters over the last 30 years.

As a result, he has decided to halve the duty paid on the popular numbers game to just 10%. There was bad news for those who prefer to have a flutter on the horses, though.

Fixed odds betting terminals in bookies will now be taxed at a higher rate of 25%, while the horserace betting levy will be extended to include bookmakers who are based offshore.

Working parents
Not all the announcements made in the Budget were surprises. It was, for example, widely reported earlier in the week that working parents will be given up to £2,000 per child to ease the cost of child care from later this year.

The plans should help to meet 85% of the costs faced by low income families, the government said.

But all families with children under 12 will be eligible, as long as the parents' joint incomes do not exceed £300,000.

Businesses
The Budget also included a number of measures designed to help businesses continue to drive the economic recovery.

These included business rate discounts and the expansion of the Annual Investment Allowance for companies to £500,000 until the end of 2015.