Budget supermarkets offer lobster for £5

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Aldi

Do you need to spend almost £25 on lobster this Christmas? Morrisons and Aldi are attempting to derail sales at the likes of Marks & Spencer and Waitrose by offering ready-to eat Signature Dressed Lobster for a £10 at Morrisons or lobster tails at £4.99 from Aldi.

There's similar keenly priced lobster offers from Asda and Lidl. You too can enjoy Lobster thermidor for just £5.

What's the catch?

Good restaurants will tell you there's a big difference between fresh-caught lobster, served with herbs, melted butter and lemon, and the fast-frozen variety some supermarkets flog you (and there's a huge difference in price). Still, lobster is lobster.

The middle-ground and discount supermarkets appear determined not to let the likes of Waitrose and M&S cream off the luxury end of food sales with their own lobster offerings (up to £24).

Selling deluxe fare like lobster means the likes of Morrisons and Aldi also pull in the cost-conscious middle classes, flogging the same patrons cheeses, wine and other Christmas goods.

But lobster for just £5? Aldi and Lidl will tell you they can do it by keeping packaging down and a tight rein on marketing costs.

Crustaceans for Christmas

Recently Aldi hired Jean-Christophe Novelli to be the chef at a one-day pop-up restaurant following a blind tasting of its food with the Mail.

(Aldi came off strongly thumping Waitrose with its "stunning" £12.99 Veuve Monsigny Champagne and £2.29 100g Scottish smoked salmon, though don't touch the Venison Plum and Brandy pate.)

Meanwhile Lidl too is offering whole cooked lobster from under £5. Supermarket lobster, obviously, means you escape the slow-kill, clanking lid carry-on of exterminating a live sea creature in your kitchen.

David Wallace, in his essay Consider the Lobster, noted lobsters communicate via pheromones in their urine. He went on: "And it's true that they are garbagemen of the sea, eaters of dead stuff, although they'll also eat some live shellfish, certain kinds of injured fish, and sometimes each other."

Still hungry?