Greggs staff banned from adding ketchup to cheese rolls

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Greggs

Greggs staff have been told that they are no longer allowed to add ketchup or brown sauce to cheese rolls. Forget ordering a tailor made sandwich; in Greggs you have to take what you're given and be thankful for it.

So why has it issued such a strange edict?


Ban

Greggs staff have the sauces handy because they offer them on bacon and sausage breakfast rolls. However, they have been informed by the 'powers that be' that they are no longer allowed to squirt these sauces on any other rolls.

The Daily Mail uncovered this bizarre trend at outlets across the country, and a spokesperson told them "research tells us our sandwich customers value speed of service as very important to them at lunchtime. This means we are unable to offer a personalised sauce option for our full sandwich range."

Why?

From the company's perspective, you can understand why they have made the move. They only charge £1.35 for a cheese roll, and if they're going to make a decent profit they need these rolls flying out of the door at lunchtime. They can't afford queues to build up while staff tailor-make the sandwiches.

There's also the fact that the chief executive said last month that the company was having to "fight for every penny", so maybe there's the issue of saving money on sauce. If speed of service was the only issue, there would be nothing stopping stores from having the sauce available for people to serve themselves. So it would seem to indicate that cost is playing its part too.

Reaction

Customers have been highly unimpressed. Malcolm Evans tweeted: "End Times! Church of England dying out warns Archbishop; Greggs rationing brown and red sauce." Stottiez said: "Stingy Greggs hides the condiments" and Harry Wallop Tweeted: "Say it ain't so! ‪@GreggstheBakers‬ has banned workers from adding ketchup to cheese rolls to cut costs".

And it's not the first ketchup ban to cause controversy

A couple of years ago all French primary schools banned tomato ketchup. They are now only allowed french fries once a week with ketchup. At the time it was said to be a move to preserve French food culture.

A similar ban was brought in at primary schools in the Vale of Glamorgan, after all mass-produced food was taken off the menu.

The banning of ketchup was one of the more controversial moves made by Paulo Di Canio during his short tenure at Sunderland. He said he did it because fitness levels were too low when he joined the club and people were having too much unhealthy sauce on their food - although he admitted it was a highly unpopular move.

Gordon Ramsay also hit the headlines for a ketchup incident. An American diner asked for ketchup with his red mullet and on hearing the restaurant didn't provide it he asked for a waiter to go out and buy some. Ramsay responded by throwing him out.

But perhaps the oddest ban was when Supermarkets in Caister-in-Sea in Norfolk banned the sale of ketchup to young people in 2008, after a spate of gangs squirting it at people's cars and homes. Sergeant Andy Brown said at the time: "I know it sounds a bit daft, but it has made a difference because we have had no more reported incidents since the supermarkets came on board with this.".

Celebrities with unusual business interests

Celebrities with unusual business interests


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