Road painters highlight non-existent school

Updated: 

Invisible school

Council road-painters were assiduous in their dedication to painting yellow lines to highlight the presence of a school. The word 'school' along with yellow zig zags was carefully daubed on the road outside Woodfield Primary in Newton, Chester.

There was only one small problem -the school had been demolished four years earlier.


The school closed in 2008, and was demolished a year later. The workmen painted the words directly next to an open grassed area.

A resident told the local paper, The Leader: "We wondered what was going on when the workmen turned up. We couldn't believe it when we came home later on and saw the markings had been redone."

A spokeswoman for the council told the Daily Telegraph: "The road markings have been painted by mistake. They will be removed when our workers are next in the area."

Road outrage

It's an embarrassing mistake, but it's far from the only time a council or their contractors have made an outrageous call over road markings.

Last month we reported about the lane in Swindon, which was far too small to squeeze a car down - which contractors decided to paint double yellow lines down. The lane is so narrow that there's only 13 inches between the lines.

Then there was the decision by Bedford Borough Council to create a 10-metre bus lane just after a junction - stopping residents of a nearby council estate from using the road, and forcing them to make a two-mile round trip.

And let's not forget the decision by North Somerset Council to install bollards a few millimetres wider than a standard car. The road connecting Mead Vale and Weston Village in Worle near Weston-Super-Mare was soon home to tailbacks and outrage.

And the battle for the country's shortest yellow lines stepped up a gear in April, when Cambridge County Council decided to use them to distinguish different sorts of parking bays - on the assumption that people will find it easier to interpret double yellow lines shorter than a typical ruler than they would some clear signage about who can park in each bay.

But what do you think? Are these the most foolish road markings in the UK? Or has another council got slap-happy with a can of paint? Let us know in the comments.

SPONSORED FINANCIAL CONTENT