Are you in denial about ageing?

Updated: 
Old ladies exercising Retirees today aren't what they used to be: they're off climbing Kilimanjaro and taking pottery classes rather than picking up their pipe and knitting needle.

The conclusion is that people don't seem to be getting old anymore and if we're not getting old then we don't have to worry about pensions and long-term care. Hooray! Or is it?


Baroness Greengross, chief executive of the International Longevity Centre believes 'our society is in denial of the inevitability of ageing' and this has led us to 'put off the difficult decisions for far too long'.

These difficult decisions are about saving enough for our retirement and having enough money in the bank to pay for decent care if we can no longer care for ourselves.

There's a very good chance that you're going to get old and there's an increasing chance that you're going to spend some of your twilight years in care. The problem is no-one wants to think about either of those things; maybe it's because of we start thinking about getting old and needing care then we start thinking about death and pondering our own mortality is never a happy past time.

Chances are you're not pondering these question but don't worry, you're in good company; the government isn't thinking about it either.

According to the Public Service and Demographic Change Committee the cost of age-related spending issue to increase from 21% of GDP in 2016/17 to 26% in 2061/62. To put it in perspective that's an increase of £79 billion in today's money.

According to the committee there has been a lack of joins up thinking when it comes to age-related costs, all of which have left our pensioners with little to live on, a confusing care system and a healthcare system that is unable to deal effectively with their needs.


It's not a surprise that we're all living longer but the government has put its head in the sand when it comes to dealing with these problems, leaving them all to fester.

Individuals need to look at how successive governments have handled the issues and cots around ageing and note its failings. The chances are you are making the same mistakes; not saving enough for retirement, assuming long-term care is something that other people need, assuming that you can always stay in your home without making modifications.

Thinking about these problems now and dealing with them in advance will ensure you don't find yourself in the situation that the government finds itself in. It may be troubling to think about old age now but it will give you peace of mind when you get there.

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