Government IT and apps in the cloud

Updated: 
Picture of some cloudsThe Government is rejigging public sector computing again - this time it's going to look a lot like standard IT with a lot of cloud-based apps being downloaded to systems in the real world. As yet the facility to actually buy any of these apps hasn't been put in place but it's a work in progress. A BBC report suggests the aim is to save £180m by 2015 although given the rate of technological change this is a difficult thing to forecast.

The good news for small software entrepreneurs is that about half the apps will be provided by small businesses. Being shut out of Government contracts has been a source of difficulty for smaller businesses for years.

Called the Cloudstore, although there's no actual store technology in it yet, the idea is to make software procurement much cheaper and easier and work in the way that the current and future generation of civil servants already download apps in their day to day lives. Increasing amounts of mobiles work in this way - Microsoft has been the last to capitulate and add an app store to its phone offering.

The Government has been talking about saving money and increasing efficiency through the cloud for some time now, with the so-called G-Cloud. Whether any of this will result in a tax cut or earlier settlement of the deficit is...excuse me, laughing too hard...

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