Rescued flying foxes try fruit

Jasmine Vink has been looking after seven grey headed flying foxes that were orphaned in the Australia bushfires and said the bats could disperse seeds over thousands of kilometres to rejuvenate damaged land.

"They were all rescued from camps in NSW where the mothers had started starving due to direct burning of their foraging grounds and an inability to find their food through thick smoke," she said.

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BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA - DECEMBER 18: (EUROPE AND AUSTRALASIA OUT) Wendy Wimberley from the Bat Clinic in Advancetown has over 130 baby bats after the wet weather. (Photo by Luke Marsden/Newspix/Getty Images)
BOMADERRY, AUSTRALIA - JANUARY 27: A baby grey headed flying fox bat named Pip is bottle-fed by caregiver Janine Davis on January 27, 2020 in Bomaderry, Australia. Davis runs the Shoalhaven Bat Clinic and Sanctuary. The center has received a large number of orphaned babies during this bushfire season, as mothers, weakened by drought and habitat devastation are unable to carry their young on their annual migration south. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
BOMADERRY, AUSTRALIA - JANUARY 27: A baby grey headed flying fox bat hangs with it's mother on January 27, 2020 in Bomaderry, Australia. The Shoalhaven Bat Clinic and Sanctuary has received a large number of bats during this bushfire season. The center rescues injured bats, rehabs them and releases them back into the wild. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
BOMADERRY, AUSTRALIA - JANUARY 27: A baby grey-headed flying fox bat named Pip is bottle-fed by caregiver Janine Davis on January 27, 2020 in Bomaderry, Australia. Davis runs the Shoalhaven Bat Clinic and Sanctuary. The center has received a large number of orphaned babies during this bushfire season, as mothers, weakened by drought and habitat devastation are unable to carry their young on their annual migration south. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
GOLD COAST, AUSTRALIA - DECEMBER 03: A Baby Flying Fox (Pteropus) hangs from a clothes line and is able to feed itself at a temporary bat rehabilitation centre on December 3, 2008 on the Gold Coast, Australia. Wildcare Australia's Head Bat Coordinator, Trish Wimberley has been caring for the flying foxes following storms that ripped through the Gold Coast hinterland causing hundreds of the babies to lose their mothers. Wildcare Australia volunteers are providing 24hour support for the flying foxes until they are strong enough to be released into the wild. (Photo by David Hardenberg/Getty Images)
GOLD COAST, AUSTRALIA - DECEMBER 03: A Baby Flying Fox (Pteropus) hangs from a clothes line at a temporary bat rehabilitation centre on December 3, 2008 on the Gold Coast, Australia. Wildcare Australia's Head Bat Coordinator, Trish Wimberley has been caring for the flying foxes following storms that ripped through the Gold Coast hinterland causing hundreds of the babies to loose their mothers. Wildcare Australia volunteers are providing 24hour support for the flying foxes until they are strong enough to be released into the wild. (Photo by David Hardenberg/Getty Images)
GOLD COAST, AUSTRALIA - DECEMBER 03: Baby Flying Foxes (Pteropus) are seen at a temporary bat rehabilitation centre on December 3, 2008 on the Gold Coast, Australia. Wildcare Australia's Head Bat Coordinator, Trish Wimberley has been caring for the flying foxes following storms that ripped through the Gold Coast hinterland causing hundreds of the babies to lose their mothers. Wildcare Australia volunteers are providing 24hour support for the flying foxes until they are strong enough to be released into the wild. (Photo by David Hardenberg/Getty Images)
GOLD COAST, AUSTRALIA - DECEMBER 03: Three Baby Flying Foxes (Pteropus) are seen at a temporary bat rehabilitation centre on December 3, 2008 on the Gold Coast, Australia. Wildcare Australia's Head Bat Coordinator, Trish Wimberley has been caring for the flying foxes following storms that ripped through the Gold Coast hinterland causing hundreds of the babies to lose their mothers. Wildcare Australia volunteers are providing 24hour support for the flying foxes until they are strong enough to be released into the wild. (Photo by David Hardenberg/Getty Images)
GOLD COAST, AUSTRALIA - DECEMBER 03: Four Baby Flying Foxes (Pteropus) are prepared to be fed at a rehabilitation centre on December 3, 2008 on the Gold Coast, Australia. Wildcare Australia's Head Bat Coordinator, Trish Wimberley has been caring for the flying foxes following storms that ripped through the Gold Coast hinterland causing hundreds of the babies to loose their mothers. Wildcare Australia volunteers are providing 24hour support for the flying foxes until they are strong enough to be released into the wild. (Photo by David Hardenberg/Getty Images)
A mother and baby grey-headed Flying fox rest in a tree before flying out to feed Sunday, March 13, 2011 at a bat colony in western Sydney, Australia. A natural food shortage caused by rains,flooding and cyclones has forced flying foxes who normally feed on pollens and nectars into suburban gardens. A large number of grey-headed Flying foxes, an endangered species, have needed to be rescued from city regions after being entangled in fruit tree netting used by residents in a bid to stop the starving bats from feeding in them. (AP Photo/Rob Griffith)
Victoria Campbell of Wild Things Sanctuary holds a small female bat which was found hanging in the Ithaca Commons in Ithaca New York on October 6, 2019. The bats is gaining weight and will soon be released back into the wild. 09252019 Wildthings Kc12 (Photo by Kate Collins / Ithaca Journal, Binghamton Press & Sun-Bulletin via Imagn Content Services, LLC/USA Today Network/Sipa USA)
Victoria Campbell of Wild Things Sanctuary in Ithaca is a licensed wildlife rehabilitator specializing in the rehabilitation of bats. 09252019 Wildthings Kc16 (Photo by Kate Collins / Ithaca Journal, Binghamton Press & Sun-Bulletin via Imagn Content Services, LLC/USA Today Network/Sipa USA)
Victoria Campbell holds Crow, a bat brought to Wild Things Sanctuary in Ithaca for a broken wing. Campbell is a licensed wildlife rehabilitator and is well-known throughout the region for her expertise in caring for injured and sick bats. 09252019 Wildthings Kc08 (Photo by Kate Collins / Ithaca Journal, Binghamton Press & Sun-Bulletin via Imagn Content Services, LLC/USA Today Network/Sipa USA)
Victoria Campbell holds Crow, a bat brought to Wild Things Sanctuary in Ithaca for a broken wing. Campbell is a licensed wildlife rehabilitator and is well-known throughout the region for her expertise in caring for injured and sick bats. 09252019 Wildthings Kc01 (Photo by Kate Collins / Ithaca Journal, Binghamton Press & Sun-Bulletin via Imagn Content Services, LLC/USA Today Network/Sipa USA)
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"Flying foxes are able to fly away from the flames of the fires but are still affected when their food sources burn and the landscape is covered in a smoke haze.

"I was quite lucky with my babies all things considered. One had grazes on her wings and thumbs from dragging herself along the ground. One had minor eye injuries, most likely from being dehydrated before she was rescued.

"A couple of them were very emotionally traumatised. As incredibly intelligent animals they can remember their trauma so they need extra reassurance to feel safe."

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