Giant island of pumice could save the Great Barrier Reef

Scientists believe a giant floating island of pumice could help restore Australia's Great Barrier Reef.

The pumice came from an underwater volcano that erupted near North Tonga and formed a floating island about the size of Manhattan.

As it heads towards Australia's northeastern coast, scientists say living organisms will hitch a ride on the pumice and bring new life to the ailing coral reefs.

12 PHOTOS
Great Barrier Reef
See Gallery
Great Barrier Reef
Australia, Great Barrier Reef, heart shaped reef, aerial view
Corals are beginning to bleach on a reef in Indonesia. Bleaching occurs as corals expel their endosymbionts (zooxanthellae) living within their tissues. When this happens the coral turns white and could potentially die.
Satellite image of Great Barrier Reef, Queensland
Corals are beginning to bleach on a reef in Indonesia. Bleaching occurs as corals expel their endosymbionts (zooxanthellae) living within their tissues. When this happens the coral turns white and could potentially die.
Corals are beginning to bleach on a reef in Indonesia. Bleaching occurs as corals expel their endosymbionts (zooxanthellae) living within their tissues. When this happens the coral turns white and could potentially die.
Beautiful coral scenes with vibrant fish life and divers
Colorful fishes and corals in the aquarium
Photo Taken In Queensland Islands, Australia
Aerial photo of Great barrier reef showing reef area with some blue water and slightly cloudy sky in background.
Aerial view of the Great Barrier Reef, a unique coral formation. Queensland, Australia
Coral texture
Elevated water temperatures from global warming or an El Nino can kill much of the coral, leaving behind only the 'bleached' white coral skeleton, Cocos Island, Pacific Ocean
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Read Full Story

FROM OUR PARTNERS