This drummer beat a box drum for over 25 hours straight

Story and video from SWNS

This drummer beat a box drum for over 25 HOURS straight - breaking the Guinness World Record.

Jared Dormer, 31, played a Cajon for 25 hours, 42 minutes, and 34 seconds, smashing the previous record of 24 hours.

The test of musical endurance left him with swollen hands, but a very triumphant feeling.

In the video he can be seen keeping time to various pop songs as a timer runs in the background.

Dormer performed the feat back Jan 15th and 16th, but his record was only just made official by Guinness.

Despite the continuous nature of the challenge, Dormer wasn’t playing the entire time.

He was allowed a 30-second break between each song and he earned a bankable five minutes each full hour of performance.

Jared Dormer, 31, played a Cajon for 25 hours, 42 minutes, and 34 seconds, smashing the previous record of 24 hours.
Jared Dormer, 31, played a Cajon for 25 hours, 42 minutes, and 34 seconds, smashing the previous record of 24 hours.

The bankable time gave him a chance to use the restroom or quickly eat a few bites of food.

“I had an eight-hour playlist that I played through a little more than three times,” said Dormer, a healthcare manager from Moose Jaw, Canada.

“There were a couple of sections with 10-12 fast songs in a row that were very tough.

“I mixed and matched though.

“I had some pop music, some gospel stuff, some Celtic stuff.

“I probably should have planned the playlist a bit better.”

Dormer first got the idea to try to break a world record at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic.

“I was thinking about the Guinness World Records, to see if there’s something I could do, and I noticed the Cajon world record had no name attached to it.

“I put in my application and they approved it after 12 weeks.

“I had to send in an audition to prove that I could play at a reasonable musical level.

“I also needed to make sure there were impartial witnesses in an open venue.

“There were so many rules behind the record, it was almost more work setting up the challenge than playing.

“After I got approved, I took the next six months to practice.”

Dormer credits both his wife and his father for helping him ultimately complete his goal.

“My dad actually never left.

“He was my coach and supporter.

“He filmed everything for me.

“My wife brought big buckets of snow for me to dip my arms in between songs.

“I did hit a few walls during the process, but now that it’s official, I feel great!”