Take That's Howard Donald left 'fuming' after his son, 4, was refused haircut for not wearing a mask

BERLIN, GERMANY - APRIL 01: Take That singer Howard Donald during the photocall 'The Band - Das Musical' with the main cast and members of the band Take That at Theater des Westens on April 1, 2019 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Isa Foltin/Getty Images)

Take That singer Howard Donald has taken to social media to tell of being left "fuming" after a hairdresser refused to cut his four-year-old son's hair as he wasn't wearing a mask.

The pop star urged people to "stand for our freedoms" saying the country is "turning into a scare mongering bulls*** regime".

The 52-year-old told his 206,000 Twitter followers: "I'm fuming. Just taken my 4 year old to get his haircut and they refused unless he was wearing a mask!!!

"It's 11 and above according to the rules. Yes covid is real especially when it comes to old and the vulnerable.

"But to make little kids wear masks is pure bulls*** just like the world which is turning into scare mongering bulls*** regime!

"Please don't let the governments turn this into a "new normal" otherwise your kids kids will be asking u why didn't you allow this crap and where did our freedoms go?

"The hairdresser in question obviously took the scare mongering to a whole new level which unfortunately is where society is going unless we stand for our freedoms back."

Donald received some criticism for his comments. One user questioned: "What if the hairdresser's health is in the vulnerable category? Thought about looking at it from that perspective?"

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Take That - The early years
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Take That - The early years
English boy band Take That pose in combat boots, boxer shorts and red boxing gloves, as worn in their first video 'Do What You Like', 1991. From left to right, Mark Owen, Howard Donald, Jason Orange, Robbie Williams and Gary Barlow. (Photo by Dave Hogan/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
English pop group Take That in London, 1991. From left to right, Gary Barlow, Howard Donald, Robbie Williams, Mark Owen and Jason Orange. (Photo by Michael Putland/Getty Images)
British boy band Take That, comprising Gary Barlow, Howard Donald, Jason Orange, Mark Owen, and Robbie Williams, London, 1991. (Photo by Michael Putland/Getty Images)
UNITED KINGDOM - JANUARY 01: CAPITAL RADIO ROADSHOW Photo of Gary BARLOW and TAKE THAT and Robbie WILLIAMS and Howard DONALD, L-R. Robbie Williams, Gary Barlow, Howard Donald (Photo by Stuart Mostyn/Redferns)
British boy band Take That, circa 1992. Left to right: Robbie Williams, Jason Orange, Howard Donald, Gary Barlow and Mark Owen. (Photo by Tim Roney/Getty Images)
UNITED KINGDOM - JANUARY 01: WEMBLEY ARENA Photo of Jason ORANGE and TAKE THAT and Mark OWEN and Robbie WILLIAMS, L-R. Mark Owen, Jason Orange, Robbie Williams (Photo by Mick Hutson/Redferns)
Take That, who are among the nominees for the Best British Newcomers award at the Music Industry Oscars, at the Hard Rock Cafe in London. (L - R) Gary Barlow, Howard Donald, Mark Owen, Robbie Williams and Jason Orange. (Photo by Neil Munns - PA Images/PA Images via Getty Images)
Take That (with Robbie Williams, red shirt) on 15.01.1993 in München / Munich. (Photo by Fryderyk Gabowicz/picture alliance via Getty Images)
English boy band Take That, circa 1993. Clockwise, from top left: Jason Orange, Howard Donald, Gary Barlow, Mark Owen and Robbie Williams. (Photo by Tim Roney/Getty Images)
Gary Barlow, Robbie Williams and Jason Orange of Take That perform live in Tokyo, March 1993 (Photo by Dave Hogan/Getty Images)
Mark Owen, Howard Donald, Gary Barlow, Robbie Williams and Jason Orange of Take That in the back of a van in Tokyo, March 1993 (Photo by Dave Hogan/Getty Images)
Howard Donald and Robbie Williams of Take That in Tokyo, March 1993 (Photo by Dave Hogan/Getty Images)
Howard Donald, Robbie Williams and Jason Orange of Take That in Tokyo, March 1993 (Photo by Dave Hogan/Getty Images)
Gary Barlow, Robbie Williams and Jason Orange of Take That in Tokyo, March 1993 (Photo by Dave Hogan/Getty Images)
Mark Owen and Robbie Williams of Take That in Tokyo, March 1993 (Photo by Dave Hogan/Getty Images)
Mark Owen, Howard Donald, Gary Barlow, Robbie Williams and Jason Orange of Take That in Tokyo, March 1993 (Photo by Dave Hogan/Getty Images)
Mark Owen, Howard Donald, Gary Barlow, Robbie Williams and Jason Orange of Take That in Tokyo, March 1993 (Photo by Dave Hogan/Getty Images)
Robbie Williams of Take That in Tokyo, March 1993 (Photo by DaveHogan/Getty Images)
Mark Owen, Howard Donald, Gary Barlow, Robbie Williams and Jason Orange of Take That wearing headbands in Tokyo, March 1993 (Photo by Dave Hogan/Getty Images)
Gary Barlow, Robbie Williams and Jason Orange of Take That in a New York cab, NY, 1995 (Photo by Dave Hogan/Getty Images)
Take That in April 1993 in Munich - Robbie Williams (Photo by Fryderyk Gabowicz/picture alliance via Getty Images)
Mark Owen, Howard Donald, Gary Barlow, Robbie Williams and Jason Orange of Take That in Tokyo, March 1993 (Photo by DaveHogan/Getty Images)
Take That perform on stage at Ahoy, Rotterdam, Netherlands, 16th March 1995, L-R Robbie Williams, Jason Orange, Gary Barlow, Howard Donald, Mark Owen. (Photo by Rob Verhorst/Redferns)
Mark Owen, Howard Donald, Gary Barlow, Robbie Williams and Jason Orange of Take That in New York, 1995 (Photo by DaveHogan/Getty Images)
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Another said: "Whilst children are less likely (but not completely safe) from experiencing symptoms, they can be asymptomatic & carry the virus and spread to others.

"Especially in close quarters like a haircut. People protecting themselves, staff, & keeping their business going is right to do."

Someone else commented: "I wonder how "fuming" you would be if said 4 year old had contracted covid 19 whilst at said hairdressers and not being enforced to wear a mask?"

Donald later responded to the criticism to say: "Freedom is maskless and to breath true oxygen and go where u want to go without people looking at u like u are a disease.

"I've already mentioned it's understandable for the old and vulnerable to wear them to stay safe. It's about the bigger picture and the control governments are having on the masses.

"Massive lockdowns where people aren't even allowed out affecting mental health."

- This article first appeared on Yahoo

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