Netflix remove blackface scene from comedy Peep Show

LONDON - MAY 20: Actors David Mitchell (L) and Robert Webb pose with the Best Comedy Programme Award for 'That Mitchell and Webb Look' in the awards room at the British Academy Television Awards at the Palladium on May 20, 2007 in London, England. (Photo by Dave Hogan/Getty Images)

Streaming service Netflix has removed a blackface scene from British comedy Peep show.

The scene in question is taken from the episode Dance Class from the second series of the show.

It sees Jez, played by Robert Webb, covered black make up while breaking taboos with girlfriend Nancy, played by Canadian actress Rachel Blanchard.

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EMBARGOED TO 0001 MONDAY SEPTEMBER 14 (Left to right) Paterson Joseph, David Mitchell and Emily Bruni from the television show 'Peep Show' during a break in filming, in Finchley, north London. Series 6 of Peep Show starts on Friday September 18, 2009 at 10pm on Channel Four.
EMBARGOED TO 0001 MONDAY SEPTEMBER 14 David Mitchell from the television show 'Peep Show' during a break in filming, in Finchley, north London. Series 6 of Peep Show starts on Friday September 18, 2009 at 10pm on Channel Four.
EMBARGOED TO 0001 MONDAY SEPTEMBER 14 Actor David Mitchell (left) and writer Sam Bain from the show 'Peep Show' during a break in filming, in Finchley, north London. Series 6 of Peep Show starts on Friday September 18, 2009 at 10pm on Channel Four.
** EMBARGOED: NOT FOR PUBLICATION BEFORE 2130 GMT SUNDAY APR. 26 2009 ** David Mitchell with the award for Best Comedy Performance recieved for Peep Show at the British Academy Television Awards at the Royal Festival Hall in central London.
David Mitchell (left) and camera man on set in North London, filming the new series of Peep Show.
David Mitchell (left) and Robert Webb during filming for the new series of Peep Show, on set in North London.
David Mitchell receives a touch up during filming for the new series of Peep Show, on set in North London.
Robert Webb studies a script during filming for the new series of Peep Show, on set in North London.
The cast and crew of Peep Show with the Best Situation Comedy award at the British Academy Television Awards at the London Palladium, W1. PUBLICATION OF THIS IMAGE AND WINNER RESULTS, IN WHATEVER MEDIUM, WHETHER PRINT, BROADCAST OR ONLINE IS UNDER STRICT EMBARGO TIL 2100 GMT SUNDAY 20 APRIL 2008.
David Mitchell and Robert Webb on set in North London filming the new series of Peep Show.
David Mitchell and Robert Webb on set in North London filming the new series of Peep Show.
David Mitchell (centre) and Robert Webb (left) with the cast from Peep Show after winning the Best TV Comedy Award at the British Comedy Awards 2006 at the London Studios in south London.
David Mitchell and Robert Webb from Peep Show arrive at the British Comedy Awards 2005
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The scene sees Jez say: "It just feels almost wrong. Are you sure this isn't racist?"

Nancy responds: "We're breaking a taboo, of course, it feels wrong.

"We've got boundaries to smash, Jeremy. It's our duty to God, Shiva, NASDAQ, whatever you want to call him.

"Jeremy, I come from America. I've seen the problems race brings up."

Jez, played by Robert Webb, in an episode of Peep Show (credit: Channel 4)

Despite Netflix acting, Channel 4, who originally aired the series between 2003 and 2015, have so far kept the scene on their own streaming service.

A spokesperson for Channel 4 said: "Channel 4 is currently undertaking a review of the principles governing how we handle historic programmes across our platforms.

"All 4's archive contains over 10,000 hours of programming spanning over 30 years.

Rachel Blanchard during "Without A Paddle" Los Angeles Premiere - Arrivals at Paramount Pictures in Los Angeles, California, United States. (Photo by Jon Kopaloff/FilmMagic)

'Many shows reflect the time they were made and some contain content which could now be regarded as inappropriate.

"It is a complex issue particularly when it relates to programmes that satirised, commented on or challenged a specific moment in our culture that is no longer relevant to audiences today.

"We understand the strong feelings provoked by some of this content but we do not believe that erasing our creative history is a quick fix for the issues affecting our society today.

"Channel 4 is committed to inclusion and diversity and opposes discrimination in any form and therefore, having reflected deeply on this subject, we are undertaking a review of the principles governing how we handle historic programmes across our platforms."

The use of offensive racial stereotypes has been being question almost across the board amongst broadcasters after the recent Black Lives Matter protests following the death of George Floyd

Both Netflix and the BBC iPlayers stopped streaming Little Britain in recent weeks, with creators and stars David Walliams and Matt Lucas both making public apologies for their use of blackface.

- This article was originally on Yahoo.

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