Detectives investigating murder of PCSO Julia James release image

An image of murdered PCSO Julia James in the clothes she was last wearing has been released by detectives.

The picture shows Ms James walking her Jack Russell, Toby, while wearing a light blue waterproof coat, blue jeans and dark Wellington-style brown boots.

Police said it was the same clothing, apart from the gloves, which she wore on Tuesday April 27.

Ms James, who was a popular community support officer, was found dead in Akholt Wood, close to her family home, in the village of Snowdown, Kent.

The PCSO, described as “fiercely loyal” by her family, died from serious head injuries while out walking her dog.

Officers from the Kent and Essex Serious Crime Directorate have also released images of part of the crime scene, about which they are keen to receive more information.

Detectives would like to speak to anyone who was within the area defined by the red lines in the map on Tuesday April 27 between 1pm and 4.30pm.

Map
Police want to speak to anyone who was within the area defined by the red lines on April 27 (Kent Police/PA)

That area is contained by boundaries of the pathways of Spinney Lane to the north, Aylesham Road to the east, Holt Street to the south and Pond Lane to the west.

Assistant Chief Constable of Kent Police, Tom Richards, said: “We’re hoping that this image of Julia wearing what she wore before her death will help jog people’s memory.

“We want to hear from people who think they saw her walking Toby on that day and we also want to speak to people who were in the area that afternoon.

“Perhaps you were going for a run, walking your own dog, driving through or farming your land.

Julia James death
Two police officers lay floral tributes in a park in Aylesham village (Kirsty O’Connor/PA)

“We want to hear from anyone who was in the area or who saw Julia. Any and all information is welcomed and our detectives will decide what is relevant to their investigation.

“We’ve had some fantastic support already from the local community and we’re incredibly grateful for their compassion and patience whilst we carry out our inquiries.

“Whilst we will not be telling people what they can and can’t do, we are urging people to be vigilant and to be aware of their surroundings.”