The charts that make grim reading for the Royal Family

Young people's opinions of the Royal Family are low, and getting lower (PA Images)
Young people's opinions of the Royal Family are low, and getting lower (PA Images)

On 2-5 June 2022, Britain will enjoy a four-day bank holiday in honour of Queen Elizabeth's Platinum Jubilee.

Among the bumper calendar of festivities will be a televised pop concert at Buckingham Palace, a Platinum Jubilee Pageant procession, and a neighbourhood Big Jubilee Lunch where members of the public are invited to celebrate together in a country-wide street party.

However for younger Brits, the long weekend is more likely to be an opportunity for two extra lie-ins than a chance to honour the monarchy.

Amid a series of royal shocks and scandals, young adults' support on the Royal Family have tumbled.

In July 2019, nearly half of 18-24 year-olds said thought having the monarchy was a good thing for Britain, according to polling by YouGov. In November 2021, that figure had dropped to one in five.

Over the same period, the proportion of this age group who said the monarchy was a bad thing for Britain almost doubled from 9 to 17%.

Young people's opinion of the monarchy is getting worse (Yahoo News UK/Flourish/YouGov)
Young people's opinion of the monarchy is getting worse (Yahoo News UK/Flourish/YouGov)

In a further worrying sign for the future of the royals, more young people now think Britain should have an elected head of state rather than a monarchy for the first time.

Opinions on the issue have shifted significantly among 18-24s in recent years, with younger people preferring a monarch as recently as three years ago.

Young people would prefer an elected head of state to a monarch (Yahoo News UK/Flourish/YouGov)
Young people would prefer an elected head of state to a monarch (Yahoo News UK/Flourish/YouGov)

In 2019, a quarter of this age group said they would prefer an elected head of state. By 2021, the figure was 41%, compared to 31% who would prefer a monarch.

The stark change in attitudes has coincided with a tumultuous time for The Firm.

In late 2019, Prince Andrew gave his disastrous interview to Newsnight's Emily Maitlis.

The Duke of York's apparent attempt to distance himself from his friendship with convicted child sex offender Jeffrey Epstein backfired spectacularly.

File photo dated 21/06/18 of the Duke of York and The Queen at Royal Ascot. Prince Andrew is staying with his mother the Queen in Scotland. The lawyer representing the Duke of York's accuser has warned against anyone ignoring the US courts as he claimed the royal's legal team have
The Duke of York is pictured with The Queen at Royal Ascot in 2018. It emerged this week that Prince Andrew and Virginia Guiffre had reached a settlement in their civil case, after she accused him of sexually assaulting her (PA Images)

His claim that he maintained a relationship with a known sex offender because of his “tendency to be too honourable” was savaged by the press, as was his apparent lack of empathy for Epstein's victims.

His defence against accusations that he had sex with Virginia Giuffre, who says she was trafficked and coerced into doing so, because he was at Pizza Express in Woking, was widely ridiculed.

Just days later, it was confirmed the Queen had stripped Andrew of his royal duties.

In 2021, Giuffre started legal action against Andrew, for allegedly sexually assaulting her when she was a teenager, a claim the Duke denies.

This week it emerged that the case had been settled out of court, with Andrew paying a sum understood to amount to millions of dollars. He has consistently denied the allegations levelled at him and the settlement does include any admission of guilt.

The Harry and Meghan effect

In 2020, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle announced their decision to step down as senior royals and to "work to become financially independent".

The split turned toxic for the family, with months of hostile briefings in the press and rumours of an unfixable rift between Harry and his brother, William, and father, Charles.

Britain's Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex(R) and Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex(L) stand on the stage at the British High Commissioner residency in Johannesburg where they  will meet with Graca Machel, widow of former South African president Nelson Mandela, in Johannesburg, on October 2, 2019. - Prince Harry recalled the hounding of his late mother Diana to denounce media treatment of his wife Meghan Markle, as the couple launched legal action against a British tabloid for invasion of privacy. (Photo by Michele Spatari / AFP) (Photo by MICHELE SPATARI/AFP via Getty Images)
Prince Harry and Meghan are the only members of the Royal Family who are more popular among younger people. (Getty Images)

The couple's explosive interview with Oprah in 2021 engulfed the royals in further controversy, after Meghan claimed there were "several conversations" within the monarchy about how dark her baby's skin might be.

The Duchess of Sussex further alleged that she was refused help after her mental health deteriorated to the point she "didn't want to be alive any more".

Opinion on the Sussexes is sharply divided by age.

For the senior royals – The Queen, Prince Charles, Camilla, William and Kate – people are more likely to have a high opinion of them the older they get.

Older people have the most positive opinion about all the senior royals (Yahoo News UK/Flourish/YouGov)
Older people have the most positive opinion about all the senior royals (Yahoo News UK/Flourish/YouGov)

For Harry and Meghan, the opposite is true.

The Sussexes are popular among 18-24s, with more than half having a positive opinion of both Meghan and Harry.

Harry and Meghan are more popular among younger people (Yahoo News UK/Flourish/YouGov)
Harry and Meghan are more popular among younger people (Yahoo News UK/Flourish/YouGov)

Among over 65s, 21% have a positive opinion of Prince Harry, and just 13% have a positive opinion of Meghan.

The figures suggest that the schism between the Sussexes and the rest of the Royal Family are part of the reason young people to turn their back on the monarchy.

The future of the monarchy

When it comes to Charles as King, the public as a whole are not convinced, with young people once again least likely to be supportive.

A third of people think Charles will be a good King, dropping to 17% among 18-24s. (Yahoo News UK/Flourish/YouGov)
A third of people think Charles will be a good King, dropping to 17% among 18-24s. (Yahoo News UK/Flourish/YouGov)

Overall, 34% of people think Charles will be a good King, compared to 17% of 18-24s. People in this age group are also most likely to think he will be a bad King, at 48%.

As to whether Camilla should become Queen, young people are apathetic.

Asked whether she should become Queen, have the title of Princess Consort, or have no title at all, 40% of 18-24s said they didn't know.

The decline in support for the royals is by no means terminal, but staying relevant to future generations is something that needs to be addressed urgently.

This will become particularly important when the line of succession passes to Charles.

The Queen is without doubt the most stabilising force of the House of Windsor, and the Royal Family needs to be prepared to deal with a future without her.