Eight cars to get excited for in 2020

In 2020, we look set for an incredibly exciting year for cars. Though autonomy and the demise of petrol and diesel are on the lips of the industry, there’s still a lot for the enthusiast and casual observer to look forward to on the horizon — particularly as the electric race heats up.

Here, we’re taking a look at some of the models we’re particularly keen to see in the metal…

Toyota Yaris GR-4

(Toyota)

With Toyota launching a new Yaris, the firm will be looking to phase its old car out of the World Rally Championship competition — but to do that, it will need to produce a road-going, high-performance version of the new machine.

That’s what the recently teased GR-4 looks set to be. Details on the car are scarce at the moment, but expect a high output engine, four-wheel-drive system and — if the teaser image is to be believed — incredibly wide arches.

Ford Mustang Mach E

(Ford)

Ford’s Mustang muscle car is an icon of old-school, V8 motoring — so, naturally, that serves as an inspiration for a high-tech electric SUV.

All that’s officially known on the car at the moment is the controversial Mustang Mach E name, a claimed 380ish mile range and that it will rival the Tesla Model X and Jaguar I-Pace. Leaked images have shown the car in full, and it looks set to be a game-changing — if controversial — car for the firm.

Audi e-tron Sportback

(Audi)

At the back end of 2018, Audi unveiled the e-tron SUV as its first-ever production electric car. It wasn’t stopping with just that though, and the follow-up car will be revealed in the coming weeks.

Set for a 2020 market launch, the e-tron Sportback looks to pack a high-tech electric powertrain into a sleeker form. It’s likely this model will be a variant of the e-tron that has a lowered rear roofline.

Porsche 911 Turbo

Porsche 911 Carrera S (Porsche)

Porsche unleashed the ‘992’ 911 earlier this year, and now it’s time for the eleventy billion variants of it to trickle onto the market.

When it comes to its supercar-rivalling options, the 911 Turbo looks set to be the first of those. Though it’s no longer the only turbocharged option in the German’s range, it will still use the moniker to symbolise impressive levels of power.

Fiat 500 Electric

Fiat 500 (Fiat)

Fiat’s 500 seems to be a car which was designed with electric power in mind. After all, it’s a car made for the city, where small proportions and light steering are the best attributes to have.

The new electric version will only play to the 500’s strengths. Nippy acceleration will help for nipping in and out of traffic, but we’ll have to wait until next year’s Geneva Motor Show to find out about more in-depth facts and figures.

Jaguar XJ

Previous-generation Jaguar XJ (Jaguar)

Jaguar’s big, sweeping XJ is an icon of the British brand. This latest one breaks with the norm, however, as you won’t find a big diesel or petrol engine under the bonnet, rather an all-electric powertrain. That’s right, the next XJ will be battery-powered.

Jaguar has already refurbished its Castle Bromwich manufacturing plant for the car, and we expect the very latest in-car tech to feature throughout.

Volkswagen Golf R

Mk8 Volkswagen Golf R-Line (Volkswagen)

The Golf R has been a huge success for Volkswagen and, with the arrival of the MK8 Golf, it’s time for a new one. Likely to follow the same format as the older car – all-wheel-drive, a turbocharged motor and supercar-scaring performance – this is a car to genuinely get excited about.

It’ll likely be an understated affair once again, and a car which delivers just as much on the practicality front as it does with performance.

Mini GP

(Mini)

Mini’s previous GP cars have been masterclasses in how to make small, exciting and brilliantly capable hot hatches. Harder and more focused than even the raciest of JCW cars, the GP has a lot of expectations levelled at it.

Due to match the output of the Clubman JCW – Mini’s current most powerful car – expect plenty of performance-inspired design touches.

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