Potholes kill or seriously injure nearly 400 cyclists in the last decade

Ted Welford
Yellow lines and a crumbling road surface is seen near the city Centre of Gloucester, as most of the roads South West UK are left in need of repair and resurfacing work after a year of heavy rainfall and recent flooding, creating potholes and debris. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Sunday January, 6, 2013. Photo credit should read: Ben Birchall/PA Wire
Yellow lines and a crumbling road surface is seen near the city Centre of Gloucester, as most of the roads South West UK are left in need of repair and resurfacing work after a year of heavy rainfall and recent flooding, creating potholes and debris. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Sunday January, 6, 2013. Photo credit should read: Ben Birchall/PA Wire

Potholes continue to be a rising problem on Britain's roads – the RAC reported an 11 per cent increase in pothole-related breakdowns in the final quarter of 2017 compared to the same period in 2016.

But now new figures from transport minister Jesse Norman show that, while potholes can damage cars, they have a much more serious effect on cyclists. The number of serious cycling accidents has hit the highest level in almost ten years, after four died and 60 were seriously injured in 2016.