Tennessee highway patrol releases dashcam footage clearing its officer of sexual harassment


Prosecutors in Campbell County, Tennessee, have cleared highway trooper Isaiah Lloyd of sexual harassment, after a motorist accused him of touching her inappropriately.

Patricia Wilson, a mother of two, was pulled over twice by Lloyd. The first time, it was for not wearing her seatbelt. Lloyd asked her if she was under the influence as she exited her vehicle, and then frisked her, patting down her waistband area before asking her to shake out her bra to show there was nothing hidden in it.

See also: On drug-driving patrol with the traffic cops

See also: Police rescue fowl from California highway

He then administered her a field sobriety test after she admitted to taking Ambien, a prescription sleep aid.

Lloyd later stopped Wilson again, this time with her two children in the car. She did not get out of the vehicle during this stop, and Lloyd says she was pulled over for illegal window tints.

It's the initial frisking that Wilson alleged was inappropriate touching, but prosecutors were shown the video from the police vehicle's dashcam. They reviewed the footage and Lloyd's actions before clearing him of sexual harassment.

In a statement, the district attorney's office said: "Our review of this matter revealed that Trooper Lloyd's actions were inconsistent with his training and Tennessee Department of Safety General Orders.

"However, we do not believe that Trooper Lloyd's actions during his encounters with Ms. Wilson in Campbell County on August 16, 2017 form the basis for any criminal charge against him."

Tennessee Highway Patrol disagreed with the DA on the first statement, saying there had been no breach of professionalism. Colonel Tracey Trott said: "After careful consideration and review, the Tennessee Highway Patrol Command Staff has advised me that Trooper Isaiah Lloyd conducted this traffic stop in a professional manner in an effort to protect the motoring public."

Lloyd has since been placed back on active duty, having been forced to take a desk position while the case was ongoing.