Jaguar Land Rover unveils autonomous all-terrain technology

Updated: 


Jaguar Land Rover has showcased an innovative new technology, which would enable autonomous vehicles to drive across a variety of different terrains with ease.

The British car manufacturer's autonomous all-terrain driving project is a multi-million pound venture, through which JLR hopes to develop the most adaptable autonomous cars yet.

The British car manufacturer's autonomous all-terrain driving project is a multi-million pound venture, through which JLR hopes to develop the most adaptable autonomous cars yet.

The vehicles will be able to predict the upcoming road surface using next-generation sensing technologies, effectively working as 'autonomous eyes'.

Tony Harper, head of research at Jaguar Land Rover, commented: "Our all-terrain autonomy research isn't just about the car driving itself on a motorway or in extreme off-road situations. It's about helping both the driven and autonomous car make their way safely through any terrain or driving situation."

The sensors will always be active, giving the vehicle the ability to think for itself and plan routes across, or around, any surface it may be presented with.

Jaguar Land Rover unveils autonomous all-terrain technology

Jaguar Land Rover unveils autonomous all-terrain technology


Amongst the research showcased is the Terrain-based speed adaption, which uses camera to anticipate a change in terrain ahead and autonomously adjusts the vehicle's speed.

Connect Convoy research, meanwhile involves sharing of information and vehicle data from one car to another. For example, a car travelling first in a convoy would advise the second on which settings are necessary.

Finally, Surface Identification and ID path sensing research uses camera, ultrasonic, radar and LIDAR sensors to give the car a 360-degree view of the world around it, allowing it to identify and predict any surface changes and thus plan its route.

"We don't want to limit future highly automated and fully autonomous technologies to tarmac," continued Harper.

"When the driver turns off the road, we want this support and assistance to continue. In the future, if you enjoy the benefits of autonomous lane keeping on a motorway at the start of your journey, we want to ensure you can use this all the way to your destination, even if this is via a rough track or gravel road.

"We are already world-leaders in all-terrain technologies: these research projects will extend that lead still further."