Council promises an end to potholes

Updated: 
Portlands Potholes
Don Ryan/Associated Press

The days of avoiding car-crippling potholes could soon be over, thanks to a new development in road-building technology.

Surrey County Council has announced that it is to treat more than 800 roads with a new "pothole-proof" coating, in a scheme that will see more than 300 miles of highway overhauled over the next three years.

The company contracted to conduct the work for the council is so confident in the technology, that it is giving it a 10-year no-pothole guarantee, the Telegraph reports.

The resurfacing project will involve workers entirely re-building the road surface, stripping the carriageway back to its foundations to make it more resistant to vibration and movement, before applying a layer of 'Superflex' asphalt, which is both flexible and water resistant.

A spokesman for Surrey County Council said: "We are not just slapping on another coat of asphalt, we are digging up the road and going back to bare bones. We're relaying the entire foundations."

The news is likely to be a welcome respite for motorists in the county, who have long suffered with some of the worst maintained roads in the country. Research by the RAC Foundation found that Surrey had the highest number of pothole-related compensation pay-outs, with nearly £250,000 paid in 842 successful damage claims.

Jason Russell, Surrey council's assistant director for highways, told the Telegraph: "We can't go on papering over the cracks with quick fixes to tired old roads forever.

"Improvements in road building and new watertight surface treatments such as Superflex mean many of the new roads will come with a 10-year guarantee from the contractor.

"Our main problem is that some of our roads are crumbling at the base, making them very susceptible to damage. This is why we're planning a £100 million project to rip out our worst roads and rebuild many of them from scratch, making these roads resistant to potholes for a decade."

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