Piers Morgan offers Clarkson tongue-in-cheek careers advice

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Media grudges don't' come much bigger than the animosity between Jeremy Clarkson and Piers Morgan, following a punch up between the pair more than a decade ago.

However, despite the duo burying the hatchet more recently, Mr Morgan has taken the opportunity to send Clarkson some advice following his punch up with Top Gear producer Oisin Tymon, which has seen him sacked from the BBC's flagship motoring show.

In an open letter to Clarkson in the Daily Mail, Morgan starts by saying: "Dear Jeremy, I'm sorry to hear you've been sacked.No, really, strangely, I actually am.

"But you didn't give the BBC much choice. You can't whack a member of your own production team in a drunken, foul-mouthed rage - however cold the food."

Talking about their famous long-running feud, Morgan adds that he could tell that the Top Gear presenter was fragile, "both emotionally and physically" when they finally returned to good terms, last summer – citing reasons including the death of Clarkson's mother, the breakdown of his marriage, numerous health issues and the spectre of being sacked, particularly following the N-word scandal that nearly lost him his job nine months ago.

Joking about their bust up in 2004, Morgan goes on to say that if Clarkson had just punched him rather than producer Tymon, "the nation would have risen as one to applaud you. I suspect an OBE might have been in the offing." Ribbing the motoring presenter further, Morgan adds: "As the only other human being that you've ever punched, I think you could have successfully argued that you hit with such pathetic weakness that it doesn't actually constitute a punch."

Morgan's latest comments come after World Endurance Champion Anthony Davidson told AOL Cars that Clarkson was a "bloody hard worker".

With his Top Gear career at an end, Morgan has lined up 10 tips for Clarkson, including disappearing to some far flung place and laying low for a while, as bigger and better job offers appear, "reading Keith Chegwin's autobiography to remind yourself how much worse your career could have been".

Morgan's final piece of advice, however, advises Clarkson to avoid the temptation to think about launching a new career in the USA: "Your teeth will never work over here."