Ferrari reveals limited edition F60 America

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Ferrari F60 America
Ferrari

The iconic Italian supercar makers have decided to celebrate 60 years of selling cars in the US with a special open-top version of the Ferrari F12, suitably named the F60 America.

Only 10 units of this ultra-exclusive supercar will be offered, to established American Ferrari collectors, for a hefty $2.5million (£1.5million). All have been snapped up already.

So what are buyers getting for their money? The F60 America is more than just an F12 with its roof removed. The front and rear end of the car has been redesigned, with the addition of sculpted aero-dynamic aprons and side vents, a more pronounced rear diffuser and tail lights that now protrude from the bodywork. Overall, the alterations give the car a more aggressive and exclusive aesthetic.

Ferrari F60 America
Ferrari


In addition to this, the styling has been enhanced further with diamond cut wheels and a re-profiled bonnet that channels air down through the cars wings. Carbon-fibre trimmed roll hoops peer over the cockpit, which has been kitted out in a two-tone black and red colour scheme that separates the passenger and driver compartments.

This two-tone effect is said to represent the North American Racing Ferraris of the 1960s. The dashboard and gauges are awash with eye-popping candy red paint and carbon fibre, while the miss-matched seats have an American flag inset.

Ferrari F60 America
Ferrari


The F60 America is powered by the same 6.3-litre V12 found in the regular F12 Berlinetta, which delivers 730bhp to the rear wheels and is controlled via a seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox. The new model is capable of reaching 0-62mph in an eye-watering 3.1 seconds but the top speed has yet to be confirmed.

However, Ferrari has pointed out that the fabric roof that comes with the car must be put on manually and more importantly will only be guaranteed to stay on the car at speeds up to 75mph. That's one way of ensuring your kids don't drive too fast if they borrow your car, at least.

Author: Padraig Mallett