Video: A Holden that was way ahead of its time

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It's funny how things that looked futuristic decades ago have a habit of looking a bit naff today.

Well while this restored Holden Hurricane might look a bit Buck Rogers-esque, the technology crammed into its swoopy body was way ahead of the curve back in 1969.

Holden is best known for making V8 muscle cars (Vauxhall's Monaro and VXR8 are Holdens underneath) and utes, but following an extensive near six-year restoration period by Holden, this '69 Hurricane concept car is better equipped than most modern saloons.

The Hurricane was powered by a conventional 262bhp 4.2-litre V8 mounted amid-ship but on the inside it was anything but.

At just 39 inches tall and with no doors, you entered the Hurricane through a hydraulically powered canopy that opened upwards and forwards over the front wheels, while twin power-elevating seats rose up and pivoted forward to provide easier access – in fact the entry procedure was similar to that of Thunderbird 2 if we recall.

Once inside and cocooned by that one-piece body, the Hurricane boasted a rear view camera, digital dash display and a guidance system.

It might not have been sat-nav, but having used a series of magnets embedded in the road at intersections providing a direction indicator on the car's TV screen, it was pretty special given decimalisation hadn't even occurred yet.

The restoration of this one off concept car was led by Paul Clarke, Holden's manager for Creative Hard Modelling, with his team bringing the Hurricane back to its former glory using as many original parts as possible and only replacements where needed made to 1969 specification.

"The entire team has done a fantastic job in bringing this beautiful concept back to life," Clarke said.

"The Hurricane plays a crucial role in Holden's story and the company has such a great sense of history and heritage that it was very important to bring it back to life. It's been a challenging but incredibly rewarding process."

We wonder if we'll be sitting here laughing at primitive technology after a restoration of Jaguar's C-X75 or Citroen's GT concept in around 40 years' time?