New Honda NSX confirmed

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It's official: the NSX is back. Honda's Research and Development Chief Mibe Toshihiro has confirmed that the Japanese manufacturer is working on a replacement.

Responding to comments from Honda president Takanobu Ito, Toshihiro outlined that the firm is ready to begin work on the next-generation of all-electric and hybrid cars, and that an NSX replacement will be part of the project.

When the original NSX was launched back in 1990 the development team behind the car used the Ferrari 348 as a benchmark. With Ferrari's 458 receiving such praise for its sensational blend of handling, power and poise we hope that Honda has been taking note of Modena's finest.

Despite F1 legend Ayrton Senna's involvement in tuning the NSX's sublime chassis, the first incarnation of Honda's supercar for the '90s was never a great seller. For many, the NSX always tried to be too like the Ferrari and wasn't individual enough.

And by the time the NSX bowed out in 2005 it really was old hat, having spanned the Ferrari 348, 355, 360 and 430, with only a minor facelift in 2002.

But with cars like the bonkers Mugen Civic Type-R and brilliantly executed CR-Z Hybrid, the potential for the new NSX to combine the Japanese firm's normally aspirated engine know-how and superb hybrid powertrain technology in a brilliantly balanced chassis looks more than promising.

Although engines haven't been confirmed, with the new NSX looking set for hybrid power, don't be surprised to see some astonishingly low emissions figures to go along with all the performance either.

Reports suggest that a concept NSX could be here as soon as next month's Tokyo Motor Show with a production version to go on sale in late 2012.

But with the automotive industry in Japan still recovering from the earthquake earlier in the year, production timescales could be put back.

Although we've been without the NSX for a while now, we hope it's a sign of Honda's intention to properly put itself back in the supercar game with a technical tour de force.

Source: Autocar