Underwater camera captures kingfisher's diver

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A dramatic fish-eye view shows life from beneath the surface - as a hidden underwater camera captures the moment a kingfisher dives from above to catch its next meal
A dramatic fish-eye view shows life from beneath the surface - as a hidden underwater camera captures the moment a kingfisher dives from above to catch its next meal

Story and video from SWNS

A dramatic fish-eye view shows life from beneath the surface - as a hidden underwater camera captures the moment a kingfisher dives from above to catch its next meal.

The hidden GoPro camera shows the last peaceful seconds of the fish swimming along beneath the water's glassy surface - just before one of them becomes lunch for the agile kingfisher.

The tiny bird, which measures no taller than 20cm, is captured from two different angles as it prepares to swiftly dive down into the water to scoop up an unsuspecting fish.

Wildlife photographer Will Hall, 26, stood and watched with his DSLR camera at the ready as the female bird perched on a tree branch just above the water, surveying the still surface below her.

Then, just as she takes off from the branch, the footage switches to the view from the GoPro, hidden underwater - to capture the second the kingfisher breaks the calmness, splashing water everywhere.

The bird emerges victorious from the water, and lands back on the branch where she sat a moment previously - but this time with her catch in her beak.

Will, from Winchester, Hants., said he was "chuffed" with the footage - which was the result of filming the kingfisher over three days.

He said: "Kingfisher photos are done to death - every wildlife photographer has a photo of a kingfisher from every angle.

"I think it only really works when accompanied by footage - and I wanted to create footage that was a bit different, and looked a bit more natural.

"I hid two GoPro cameras underwater in two different locations, to hedge my bets, and left them for about an hour or 90 minutes each time as she came and had a few feeds.

"I stood nearby in a hide and watched as she kept coming back.

"The kingfishers don't really mind you being there, but they're quite shy animals, so you have to stand well back if you're there taking photos of them."

Will added: "The footage I ended up with was stitched together from different feeds over about three days - but it was worth it, though. I'm pleased with what I put together."

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