NHS is vaccinating at rate of 200 jabs a minute – Hancock

PA

The NHS is vaccinating people against Covid-19 at the rate of 200 jabs every minute, Matt Hancock has said.

The Health Secretary told MPs the UK has now given more than five million doses of coronavirus vaccines to 4.6 million people.

“This virus is a lethal threat to us all and, as we respond through this huge endeavour (to vaccinate), let’s all take comfort in the fact we’re giving 200 vaccinations every minute,” he said.

“In the meantime, everyone must follow the rules to protect the NHS and save lives, and we can do that safe in the knowledge that the tide will turn and that, with science, we will prevail.”

HEALTH Coronavirus
HEALTH Coronavirus

Mr Hancock told MPs that 63% of care home residents have now been inoculated, and said early indications are that Covid-19 vaccines can deal with some of the newer variants of the virus.

In response to a question from shadow health secretary Jonathan Ashworth on the South African variant which may pose a reinfection risk, Mr Hancock said: “Obviously we are vigilant to this and keep this under close review.

“I’m glad to say that the early indications are that the new variant is dealt with by the vaccine just as much as the old variant, but of course we are vigilant to the new variants that we’re seeing overseas.”

HEALTH Coronavirus
HEALTH Coronavirus

It came as experts tracking the spread of Covid-19 in England said infections may have gone up at the beginning of the current lockdown.

Professor Paul Elliot, who is leading the React study at Imperial College London, suggested the current measures may not be strict enough to see a drop in infections and the reproductive rate – the R.

The study involving 143,000 people, who were randomly selected, looked at the prevalence of coronavirus including in people without symptoms.

Infections from January 6 to 15 were 50% higher than in early December, the study found.

Prof Elliott told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme that the current R rate – which represents how many people an infected person will pass the virus on to – is “around 1”.

He added: “We’re in a position where the levels are high and are not falling now within the period of this current lockdown.”

HEALTH Coronavirus DeadliestDay
HEALTH Coronavirus DeadliestDay

Steven Riley, professor of infectious disease dynamics at Imperial, told Times Radio the study had examined a long enough time period to assess the current lockdown.

“It’s long enough that, were the lockdown working effectively, we would certainly have hoped to have seen a decline,” he said.

He said data from previous lockdowns did show a fall, adding that the current research “certainly doesn’t support the conclusion that lockdown is working”.

On what he expects will happen in the current lockdown, he said: “We would expect a similar plateau, a very gradual increase (of infections), if behaviour stays the same and, if our interpretation is correct, if what we are seeing is kind of the result of the post-Christmas period behaviour.”

Government data shows that the number of new cases of Covid-19 per head of population has been falling in all regions of England.

General view of ambulances outside the Royal London Hospital (Dominic Lipinski/PA)
General view of ambulances outside the Royal London Hospital (Dominic Lipinski/PA)

For example, in London, the rolling seven-day rate as of January 15 stood at 703.7 cases per 100,000 people – down from 1,053.4 a week earlier, and the lowest since the seven days to December 19.

Eastern England is currently recording a seven-day rate of 526.8, down from 763.5 and the lowest since December 20.

The Government said the React study does not yet take full account of the current lockdown measures.

In the study, swab tests suggested 1.58% of all people had the virus in early January, up from 0.91% in December.

London had the highest level in the January period at 2.8%, up from 1.21% in early December.

Mobility data in the study, carried out with Ipsos Mori, suggests movement decreased at the end of December, coinciding with Christmas, and increased at the start of January.

Elsewhere, Education Secretary Gavin Williamson said he hopes schools in England can fully reopen before Easter.

“I would certainly hope that that would be certainly before Easter,” he told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme.

Signage outside a closed West Bridgford Infants School in Nottingham (Tim Goode/PA)
Signage outside a closed West Bridgford Infants School in Nottingham (Tim Goode/PA)

He also told Sky News that he intends to give schools and parents a “clear two-week notice period” of reopening.

Meanwhile, Professor Anthony Harnden, deputy chairman of the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI), told ITV’s Good Morning Britain that the UK is in a “dire situation” at the moment but insisted that delaying the second dose of vaccines by up to 12 weeks is the right thing to do.

The history of using other vaccines has shown that “one dose often offers really good protection”, he said.

He added: “For instance, the HPV vaccine initially was licensed for three doses; we’re now thinking about giving it as one dose.

“And there are lots of examples of this, it is biologically completely implausible that the protection (from one dose) will suddenly drop off after three weeks.

“And so, from a public health perspective, an emergency perspective, this is the right thing to do.”

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