Motorcyclist sets 109mph handlebar wheelie record

A motorcyclist from County Durham has performed the fastest ever handlebar wheelie, by travelling at 109.2mph – and says he can go faster.

Jonny Davies, also known as “Stunter Jonny”, performed the stunt – which sees riders rest their legs over their handlebars – at the Motorcycle Wheelie World Championship at Elvington Airfield, North Yorkshire.

The father-of-one from Peterlee says he managed 122mph in practice, well above the previous record of 108mph, but a strong headwind made the ride more difficult and dangerous.

High chair wheelie record attempt
High chair wheelie record attempt

“It was like someone was pressing the helmet off my face because the wind was so strong,” the 28-year-old told the PA news agency.

“But to be fair it made it a bit more enjoyable as it made it more of a challenge.

“I was just trying to concentrate, on balancing, both left and right and with the throttle and brake… I’ve also got to change gear with my thumb.

“It’s like being on a rollercoaster that’s moving around underneath you, and you aren’t strapped in, you could just fall off at any time.

“It’s just nice to get home safe to my family.”

A multi-skilled maintenance technician by trade, Mr Davies only rode a motorbike over 100mph for the first time in the last year.

Jonny Davies
Jonny Davies

Usually a stunt rider for tricks at slower speeds, Mr Davies watched a friend achieve a wheelie handstand record at the same championships last year and decided to buy a new faster bike so he could do the same.

“I’d never been over 100 on two wheels, and my goal was to go over 100 on one wheel sat on the handlebars,” he said.

Mr Davies has ridden motorbikes since he was three, starting with wheelies on dirt bikes when he got older.

“Once I turned 17 I sold my motorbike to get a car so I could get to work,” he said.

“But once my four-year apprenticeship was up I saved up enough money to buy my first designated stunt bike.”

He has been riding that stunt bike for five years now, practising every Sunday and winning British and Scottish championships last year.

“Stepping into this world record was a whole new game,” he said.

“I modified the bike over the winter, had my first practice in March, then lockdown happened, so I couldn’t get back out until June or July.

“I’d only had three practices before this really – it’s been quite a steep learning curve.”