Gales and rain to hit UK after Hurricane Maria

Gales and rain to hit UK after Hurricane Maria

The UK is set to experience gales and heavy rain - thanks to the tail-end effects of Hurricane Maria heading across the North Atlantic.

The weather system is heading north out of the tropics and, while hurricanes lose energy and power when not connected to warmer waters, weak effects can still be felt.

SEE ALSO: 'Blood snow' is becoming an issue on Alaska's glaciers

SEE ALSO: Puerto Rico dam failure sparks evacuation of thousands


Speaking to the Standard , Frank Saunders, duty chief meteorologist at the Met Office, explained: "Ex-Maria is likely to impact our weather towards the end of the weekend and into the beginning of next week.

"However, it is important to say that any weather impacts will be far from those experienced in the Caribbean.

According to the Telegraph, he added: "Hurricanes gain their energy from the warm tropical waters and ex-Maria will be modified significantly as it tracks over the cool North Atlantic ocean.

"Ex-Maria will still contain tropical air brought north and it is this air which has the potential to affect our weather. Our waters are far too cool to sustain an actual hurricane."

So what can we expect? It looks like the weather will become more unsettled from the end of this weekend. The Met Office forecast for the week beginning Sunday 1 October reads: "Sunday and Monday are expected to be rather wet days with spells of rain in most areas followed by brighter and showery conditions.

"It's also expected to be windy with gales likely in places. Unsettled weather will then continue during the middle of next week with spells of rain travelling eastwards, and brighter, showery weather following along behind.

"It will be windy with the risk of gales in places, particularly across northern and western coasts.

"Later on next week we may see more settled conditions develop, chiefly across southern parts which will give an increased risk of fog forming overnight.

"Temperatures will be around average, but with a chance of frost in clear spells overnight."

20 PHOTOS
Weather sayings: True or false?
See Gallery
Weather sayings: True or false?
Seeing a ring or arc around the moon is often a good indication that the weather is changing. The Weather Channel says that due to the structure and angle of an approaching warm front a hazy layer of cloud can sometimes be seen high in the sky before the rain arrives.

Seeing a red sky at night means that an area of high pressure is moving in from the west so there will be a good chance of dry and fine weather the next day. According to The Weather Channel, red sky in the morning means that the high pressure has already passed and wet and windy weather is on its way!

True! A red sky in the morning means the high pressure system has already moved east meaning the good weather has passed and wet and windy low pressure system is heading our way.
Weather records began in 1861 and since then there has been no mention of 40 dry or 40 days of rain after St Swithin's day on 15 July, says The Weather Channel.
The Pennsylvania groundhog (Punxsutawney Phil) gives a weather prediction each year on February 5 and according to tradition, if he sees his shadow and retuns to his hole then there will be another six weeks of winter. But The Weather Channel says Phil's predictions have only been right 39 per cent of the time. 
Scientists have proved that there is a link between cows' behaviour and the weather. Researchers found that cows stand when the weather is warmer and are more likely to lie on the ground when it's cooler - such as just before it rains! 
Swallows fly at the same height as the insects they are trying to catch and eat. When the weather is warmer, the insects are propelled higher by the rising hot air - therefore the swallows have to fly higher when the weather is warmer! 
Late night rain and early morning rain are often an indication of a front passing by and this happens as often during the day as it does as night, which means rain in the morning doesn't mean it won't rain at night. 
Seagulls tend to sleep on water but when it's windy and the water becomes choppy they will move inland and huddle on the beach. 
This old proverb is thought to be a warning not to take off your clout (winter clothes) until the may blossom (better known as Hawthorn) is out because it heralds warm weather. Until you see it in full bloom there's always a chance the cold weather will return in the spring months, which happens quite frequently in the UK.
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Read Full Story

FROM OUR PARTNERS