Would you live here? World's most remote towns



Talk about off-the-beaten-track. With spectacular settings, incredible views and more peace and quiet than you could ever imagine, it's not hard to see why anyone would want to live in one of the world's secluded settlements.

Cut off from the world and with little electricity or WiFi, the residents of these remote communities might not care for the latest technology when they have their own part of a canyon, a tropical island paradise to themselves or their own floating village on a lake.

Fancy a visit to a secluded spot? In South America, mystical desert oasis Huacachina is located around five hours south of Lima and has just 115 residents but is an excellent place to ride Peru's sand dunes. For somewhere even harder to reach, take a trip to the island of Tristan da Cunha, an active volcano with rare wildlife including rockhopper penguins and the Yellow-nosed Albatross. It's located 1,750 miles from South Africa and can only be reached by sea on a seven-day boat journey from Cape Town.

See more of the world's most remote towns and villages, including Supai in Arizona, Palmerston in the Cook Islands and Undredal in Norway.

13 PHOTOS
Beautiful remote communities around the world
See Gallery
Would you live here? World's most remote towns

Located on the island of Vágar, Gásadalur is surrounded by the highest mountains on the island: Árnafjall at a height of 722 metres to the north and Eysturtindur at 715 metres high to the east. The population of the village has reduced over the years due to the strenuous route over 400-metre-high mountains to reach other villages. There are currently 18 people living in Gásadalur.

Set in the hills above the Gorge de Verdon, the tiny French village of Rougon, with its population of 137, offers a great view of the gorge and is known for its resident vulture colony. The hidden village sits under a large rocky outcrop and is home to the Saint Christophe chapel, the remains of a castle and houses built in the Renaissance.

The island of Tristan da Cunha, part of British Overseas Territory in the South Atlantic Ocean, has just 275 people residing on it and is an active volcano boasting rare wildlife including rockhopper penguins and the Yellow-nosed Albatross. The island is located 1,750 miles from South Africa and can only be reached by sea on a seven-day boat journey from Cape Town. It's part of the Tristan da Cunha group of islands, which includes Saint Helena Island and is the most remote inhabited archipelago in the world.

A mystical desert oasis in Peru, Huacachina is located around five hours south of Lima and 10 minutes from downtown Ica. It is a small natural lake surrounded by palm trees and huge sand dunes with a population of just 115. The town attracts tourists who travel from around the world to ride the dunes.

One of the world's most mysterious places, Easter Island, is also one of most remote inhabited islands with a population of just over 5,700 and its location in the south-eastern Pacific Ocean, 3,510km west of Chile. Easter Island's Polynesian name is Rapa Nui and it is famous for its 887 eerie-looking monolithic statues, moai, which were created by the early Rapanui people and scattered around the island. The island is surrounded by the world's most transparent waters and has three extinct volcanoes.

The floating islands of Uros are artificial islands on Lake Titicaca in Peru. The islands are made of totora reeds tied together and feature huts, a hospital and even electricity on some of the 45 islands. The largest of the islands house around 10 families, while the smaller islands are home to two or three.

Greenland's most isolated town is as far as one can get from any other inhabited area in the country, making just getting there an adventure for visitors. Ittoqqortoormiit's population is 452 and the closest neighbour is the world’s largest national park with the Danish Sirius Patrol as the only human presence in the vast landscape dominated by small game, birds, polar bears, musk oxen, reindeer and walrus. The town has one grocery shop and a couple of small convenience stores.

It's the largest settlement of the Svalbard islands but Longyearbyen is one of the world's most remote towns, where the sun doesn't rise for four months and there are just 2,000 inhabitants. Longyearbyen is home to Svalbard's airport, along with a school, shopping centre, restaurants and museums.

The island of Palmerston is so remote that it was not properly located on maps until 1969. The atoll is made up of the summit of an old volcano and has no airport. Electricity runs from 6am to 12pm each day and again at night. The tiny Pacific island is only visited by a supply ship twice a year and most of its 63 inhabitants are descended from one Englishman who settled on Palmerston 150 years ago.

An oasis in the Havasu Canyon, Supai is a small village with spectacular waterfalls and a unique part of the Grand Canyon region. It is not accessible by road and the Havasupai Tribe administers the land. It is the most remote community in America's lower 48 states and has a population of 208. The only way to reach Supai is to take a helicopter, hike or ride a donkey along the Havasupai Trail.

The village of Tahsis is located on the west coast of Vancouver Island at the head of the steep-sided Tahsis Inlet. In its heyday, the village's population was around 2,500 but following the closure of the local sawmill in 2001, the population is just 316 today. Tahsis is a summer beauty spot which attracts hikers, scuba divers and wildlife enthusiasts.

Sonogno is the last village on the paved road in Valle Verzasca, located at an elevation of 918m. Visitors to the pretty village are required to leave their vehicles at the entrance to Sonogno, which has a total population of 94. It has its own language, which is a mixture of Latin and Celtic, but most of the population speak Italian. Sonogno has retained its typical architectural character of historic houses and narrow alleyways.

The beautiful village of Undredal is located in Norway's 'fjord-country' along the Aurlandsfjorden. It is home to the smallest stave church in Northern Europe and has a population of 100 people and 500 goats. Before 1988, Undredal was only accessible by boat but today it can be reached by a narrow road 6.5km north of the E16 highway.

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE


Related articles

Camping holidays: World's coolest campsites

Remote hotels for proper escapes

New airport set to boost tourism at remote British island of St Helena


10 PHOTOS
World's most remote islands
See Gallery
Would you live here? World's most remote towns

Desroches Island in the Indian Ocean is the perfect place for complete isolation and to de-stress on an exotic island. Its remoteness means there's no mobile phone signal and the only sounds you'll hear are the ones provided by Mother Nature! The paradise island is located 230km from Mahe in the Seychelles and can be reached by plane or yacht. Desroches is concealed beneath the shade of coconut palms and vegetation, with various beach retreats to sleep in. Stay in one of the Beach Villas, which have their own private gardens and swimming pools.

For the experience of a lifetime visit one of the most isolated islands of the world, Jana Mayen, which is Norwegian territory and lies 600km from Iceland. Although tourists visiting the island are extremely rare, Hurtigruten's The Climate Voyage visits the remote island with the MS Fram ship on a tour starting from Iceland and ending in Svalbard with discussions about shore landings and climate change on the way. From £2,360 for an eight-day voyage.

With acres of botanical gardens, secluded beaches dotted along the 32km of diverse coastline and a relaxed pace of life, you'll want to pack your bag and head to Norfolk Island for a holiday. The island is located 1,412km east of mainland Australia with a population of 2,300 and plenty to do on a laidback break. Fishing, surfing, horse riding and cycling are just a few of the activities available and when it comes to eating, there's fresh food from the sea and land, plus pretty cottages, apartments and hotels on the island to stay in. The island may be far from mainland Australia but there's shopping, wining and dining and a great social scene to enjoy, with galleries and markets to visit too.

Located 1,500 miles off the coast of Cape Town and part of the British Overseas Territory is the island of Saint Helena, which is 47 square miles in size and has a population of over 4,000 with just 2,000 tourists visiting per year. Saint Helena boasts stunning natural beauty and is steeped in history while best known as the place of Napoleon's exile. The only access to the island is by sea and it's made up of rocky terrain and forest with the national park Diana's Peak as its highest point. The RMS St Helena passenger ship visits several ports of call including Saint Helena, Ascension Island and Cape Town. A 10-day voyage costs £2,121 per person.

As Canada's most northerly island, you can imagine that Ellesmere is pretty cold. It is part of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and is one of the world's largest islands, where North America’s most northern community, Grise Fiord is located. Ellesmere is home to the Quttinirpaaq National Park, which covers most of the island, the huge Lake Hazen and plenty of glaciers and ice! The population of the 75,767 square-mile island is just 146 and some of the wildlife you may see in the national park includes rare Peary caribou, musk oxen or arctic wolves. Hiking, climbing and skiing are a few of the activities available in the national park.

Located off the northwest tip of the island of New Guinea in Indonesia, the Raja Ampat archipelago is mostly uninhabited and purely stunning. The archipelago is only accessible by boat and comprises of over 1,500 small islands and the four main islands of Misool, Salawati, Batanta and Waigeo. The islands are incredibly remote and almost undisturbed by humans, while best known for their amazing marine life with one of the richest coral reef ecosystems in the world making them a haven for scuba divers, kayakers and snorkelers. Get there on the 34-metre Tiger Blue yacht, which will take you through the islands to see the dramatic landscapes, coastlines and wonderful wildlife of the Raja Ampat Islands.

The privately-owned island of Petit St Vincent, known locally as PSV, is located on the most southern tip of the Grenadines offering guests an escape from modern day stresses and has just 22 private cottages spread over 113 acres of rolling hills. Here you can enjoy all-out luxury and complete disconnection from the outside world - there are no TVs, phones or internet in the cottages. The cottages do, however, have wooden sundecks and sunken living rooms - perfect for relaxing and not caring about your emails! Around the island there's two miles of white sand beaches, meditating yoga sessions in a pavilion looking out over Concha Bay, as well as scuba diving to explore the coral reefs and hiking to the summit of the island to discover the orchids and banyan trees. Could an island escape get any better than this?

If you want an island getaway that's far away from everything, tranquil and undeveloped, head to the gorgeous Gambier archipelago, which lies over 1,600km southeast of Tahiti in French Polynesia and stay on the largest island Mangareva. There is one flight from Tahiti a week and a local boat meets passengers at the airport. Once on the island, you can explore the main village of Rikitea with its cathedral that has an altar adorned with pearls, see the ruins of Rikitea, which include a convent, a number of watchtowers, a jail and a court, and hike to Mt Duff to see the stunning views of the pearl-rich lagoons of Mangareva.

The island of Tristan da Cunha, part of British Overseas Territory in the South Atlantic Ocean, has just 261 people residing on it and is an active volcano boasting rare wildlife including rockhopper penguins and the Yellow-nosed Albatross. The island is located 1,750 miles from South Africa and can only be reached by sea, on once-yearly sea crossings or on a fishing vessel from Cape Town. It's part of the Tristan da Cunha group of islands, which includes Saint Helena Island and is the most remote inhabited archipelago in the world. On Tristan da Cunha you'll find B&B accommodation, a museum, post office where there are ladies that make great cakes and coffee, plus the world's most remote golf course. Don't leave the island without trying the high quality crayfish, buying a novelty penguin knitted by local women and browsing its famous collectable stamps.

One of the world's most mysterious places, Easter Island, is also one of most remote inhabited islands with just over 5,000 people residing on it and located in the south-eastern Pacific Ocean 3,510km west of Chile. Easter Island's Polynesian name is Rapa Nui and it is famous for its 887 eerie-looking monolithic statues, moai, which were created by the early Rapanui people and scattered around the island. The island is surrounded by the world's most transparent waters and has three extinct volcanoes. Explora offers trips to Easter Island where you can stay at the beautiful Posada de Mike Rapu lodge on a hill in the centre of the island and choose from 15 different walking or cycling treks.

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE


%VIRTUAL-TripAdvisorWidget%

10 Of The World's Most Remote Towns

Timelapse Captures Eclipse over Faroe Islands
Read Full Story

FROM OUR PARTNERS