Two men filmed 'train surfing' in New Zealand (video)

Two men filmed 'train surfing' in New Zealand (video)

A motorist has filmed the moment he spotted two men 'surfing' on the back of a high speed train in New Zealand.

The men can be seen precariously clinging to the back of the commuter train as the car passenger films the scene from the road.

They were filmed by Alexey Zhavoronkov near Manor Park station in Upper Hutt, Wellington, going at around 90kph (56mph). The train was stopped two stations later but the men had already disembarked.

Police are now asking for anyone who might recognise the men or knows who they are to come forward.

Speaking to, Alexey said: "My wife, who was driving, saw them and said 'look at them, they're crazy'."

"We're originally from Russia and this kind of madness is more like normal there ... it was a shock to see people here doing it. It's really dangerous ... it was scary."

KiwiRail general manager of Metro David Shepherd condemned the actions of the men, telling the NZ Herald: "Trespassing on the rail corridor is a huge problem and people who do this, whether it's being on the rail corridor or riding on the back of a train, run the risk of not only killing themselves but also traumatising the people who then have to deal with the consequences of their actions.

"There is no doubt in my mind that those two young men could have been killed or very seriously injured with long lasting consequences for their families, emergency services and Tranz Metro staff.

"We will be doing everything we can to help police identify these two young men and strongly urge anybody considering trespassing on the rail corridor to think about the value of their life and how their families will feel if they are killed or injured."

TrackSAFE NZ Manager Megan Drayton said: "People need to realise that the rail corridor is dangerous and the outcome of being struck by a train is usually fatal," she said.

"The only legal place to cross a track is at a level crossing. Trespassers run the risk of a criminal conviction including the prospect a large fine. People need to seriously consider whether it is really worth it."

10 scenic train trips in Europe
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Two men filmed 'train surfing' in New Zealand (video)

The line between Glasgow and Mallaig is one of Britain’s most eye-catching train journeys. During the course of the 164-mile route, the “Road to the Isles” hugs the banks of Loch Lomond on departure from Glasgow, before making its way past castles, mountains (including Ben Nevis) and waterfalls en route to Scotland’s west coast. Then, just as you approach the journey’s end, the track crosses the spectacular Glenfinnan Viaduct, made famous by the Harry Potter movies.

There’s no disputing the Cote d’Azur is one of Europe’s loveliest coastlines, with golden beaches and bright blue waters stretching for more than 100km. Skirt the shoreline from Fréjus in France to Ventimiglia in Italy and you can give this sandy playground a closer inspection, because there are ample opportunities to stop and soak up the atmosphere if you catch one of the daily regional TER trains, which call at Cannes, Antibes, Nice, Eze and other stops along the way.

Keep your eyes on the skies on the daily InterCity from Venice to Munich, which weaves through the mighty Alps on the Austrian-Italian border. Following one of Europe’s great trade routes, the train calls at some of Italy’s finest Renaissance towns, before continuing to Innsbruck via the Brenner Alpine pass. The section between Verona, Bolzano and Fortezza is particularly striking as the train traces the river Isarco north in the shadow of the Dolomites, briefly crossing into Austria before arriving into Munich in time for dinner.

The narrow-gauge railway from Nice to Digne les Bains, in the Alpes-de-Haute-Provence region, is a relative unknown in the world of scenic trains. A 90-mile journey taking around three hours, it crosses rivers and passes through enchanting communities such as St Andre les Alpes and Entreveux. This is a private railway, so it often remains undiscovered unless you’re on a tour. However, it’s open for exploration by independent travellers, too, departing Nice CFP station four times per day. 

A train trip doesn’t need to be long to be beautiful. The stretch from Messina to Catania in Sicily takes just 90 minutes, but the views of the coast and Ionian Sea are something to remember. If you’re travelling overnight from Rome, you’ll wake at daybreak to find the train being loaded onto a ferry. And from the moment you’re on Sicilian shores until your arrival in Catania you’re spoiled for choice – look east to see the rocky Mediterranean coastline and bobbing fishing boats, and west for none other than the peak of Mount Etna, Europe's tallest active volcano.

The joy of train travel is the transition from one place to another, watching the landscape unfold before you as you cross borders by rail. Starting out in Zurich’s cosmopolitan centre, this train quickly ascends into the Swiss Alps, passing green lakes, quaint villages, and snowy peaks. Just a few hours later you’ll descend into Italy, to the shores of Lake Como, catching a glimpse of the cupola of the cathedral and the lakeside villas bounded by Cypress trees. The Zurich to Como route is done on an everyday InterCity train, with no panoramic windows or fancy title to its name, yet it’s still a stunner of a trip. 

The Golden Pass refers to the stretch of railway from Montreux to Lucerne in the Swiss Alps. Though feasible in a day, the route isn’t one to conquer in such a short time, and should be savoured. With countless opportunities to get off and explore, it’s easy to build your own itinerary on Switzerland’s famous scenic railways. The region is home to a host of scenic services, including glass-topped panoramic trains and funicular railways, so it’s little wonder that the Oberland attracts such wide praise from train travellers. Between Lucerne and Interlaken the landscape is exceptionally beautiful, passing the emerald-green waters of Lake Lungern and lakeside hamlets at the Brunig Pass.  

Travelling at around 20mph, this scenic train is the epitome of slow travel. But although the Bernina “Express” hardly deserves its title, as it winds through the southern Alps, over bridges, gorges and precarious mountain passes, you wouldn’t want it to go any faster. Crossing some 200 bridges and passing through mountains via 55 tunnels, this is a feat of engineering so impressive that it has earned Unesco World Heritage status. The panoramic train has been designed to offer a ringside seat and as the rails mount the Albula pass to St Moritz, you won’t be disappointed by the views. 

Fjords, glaciers and snow-capped peaks provide the spectacle on the Bergen Line, one of Scandinavia’s most impressive train journeys. Travelling from Oslo to Bergen in around seven hours, the trip’s highlights include Europe’s largest mountain plateau, Hardangervidda. But it’s not just the views that impress; the railway itself is extraordinary. More than 15,000 men laid this track into the peaks and dug 182 tunnels out of mountain rock, by hand. Construction started in 1875 – and took 34 years to complete. 
An unexpected beauty in Spain, the train between Madrid and Oviedo offers a glimpse of classic Spanish countryside on its way from the capital to the north coast. And as the train approaches the Asturias region, and its principal city Oviedo, it climbs into the clouds, passing through the Picos de Europa mountains. Upon arrival in Oviedo, the train remains the best way to continue your explorations of the area: take a Feve narrow-gauge railway to Galicia and the Basque Country.

Beautiful train stations around the world
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Two men filmed 'train surfing' in New Zealand (video)

Whether you're catching a train or just looking for an iconic place to visit, New York's Grand Central Terminal is a must-see if you're in the city. The Main Concourse has been featured in countless TV programmes and films, and is as romantic in reality as it is on screen, with the ceiling displaying its famous mural of the constellations. Around the station you'll find shops, upscale restaurants and a branch of the New York Transit Museum. Don't miss the Whispering Gallery in front of the Oyster Bar restaurant where you and a friend can stand at opposite corners of the arched entryway and whisper into the corners to hear each other's voices as if you were standing next to each other! The Biltmore Room, also known as the Kissing Room, is located below the former Biltmore Hotel and is known as being the place where passengers would get off the train and greet their loved ones with hugs and kisses.

Mumbai's Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus, once named Victoria Terminus after Queen Victoria, is one of India's most beautiful UNESCO World Heritage Sites and an architectural masterpiece, boasting a fusion of Victorian Gothic and traditional Indian style. As India's busiest railway station with millions of commuters using it every day, it serves suburban railway services and long distance trains. Don't miss the figures on top of the columns at the entry gates - the lion represents Britain and the tiger represents India.

The Sao Bento station in the city of Porto, Portugal is best known for its intricate tiles that adorn the walls of the vestibule. The 20,000 tiles dating from 1906 to 1916 were painted by Jorge Colaco, who was the most important azulejo painter at the time. They illustrate the evolution of transport and historical events in Portuguese life, such as the arrival of King John I and Philippa of Lancaster in Porto in 1387 and the Conquest of Ceuta in 1415. The 20th century station was built where the former Convent of Sao Bento de Ave-Maria was located and its glass and iron structure was designed by architect Marques da Silva.

Set in a valley on the banks of the Pipo River in the Tierra del Fuego National Park, Ushuaia Station is known as the End of the World station where prisoners were sent to labour camps in the 20th century. Today the station is popular with tourists who come to take in the spectacular views from the luxury steam train that leaves the station. The route takes passengers along the Pico Valley and the Cascada de la Macarena station to learn about the Yamana people. There's also a stop where you can climb to a viewpoint and get a closer look at the stunning surroundings.

One of the oldest and most beautiful train stations in Thailand, Hua Hin Railway Station is well worth a visit to see its pretty Royal Waiting Room, which used to welcome King Rama VI. The wooden building was originally a royal pavilion located in the Sanamchan Palace in Nakom Pathom and was moved to Hua Hin in 1968. The Thai-style design is similar to the Maruekkhathayawan Palace - another must-see attraction for taking photos in Hua Hin. Behind the station you'll find the Royal Hua Hin Golf Course, which was the first to be built in Thailand.

Image: takumi.412. Used under Creative Commons Licence CC BY 2.0.

With a striking mint-green exterior and large dome that was reportedly designed by Gustave Eiffel, the CFM Railway Station in the Mozambique capital of Maputo is a fine example of colonial-style architecture built in the 20th century. Historic steam locomotives are on show at the station and modern trains stop here daily. Be sure to check out the Chez Rangel jazz cafe inside the station, which is a popular night spot in the city. On most weekends you can enjoy live music or choose from the large collection of old jazz gramophone records.

Image: MauritsV. Used under Creative Commons Licence CC BY 2.0.

Looking for the train station with the most amazing view? Visit Mexico's Divisadero Barrancas, where the descent to the Urique River begins. The station is a stop off for the Copper Canyon train that takes passengers along one of the world's deepest canyons. Here you can admire the Tararecua, Urique and Del Cobre ravines, pose for photos at the canyon edge, and even try staring down into it, if you're brave enough! Be sure to grab a tortilla at the station once you've taken in the views - they're freshly cooked by Tarahumara Indians.

Turkey's busiest railway station Haydarpasa Terminal is also one of the country's architectural wonders, built on 1,100 wooden beams and surrounded by the sea on three sides. The neo-classical, castle-like structure in Istanbul's Kadikoy district was built in 1908 as a gift to the Sultan Abdulhamid II by his German ally Kaiser Wilhelm II. German and Italian stonemasons crafted the stunning facade, which consists of textured sandstone and a steep pitched roof. As well as welcoming passengers arriving in Istanbul from Anatolia, the station has its own ferry dock.

The futuristic design of the Tsuzumi Gate at Kanazawa Station caused controversy when it was unveiled in 2005, due to it clashing with the traditional architecture of one of Japan's best-preserved castle towns. The modern entrance designed in the style of a hand drum and the Motenashi Dome, which was also revealed in 2005, have been popular with photographers and tourists in Kanazawa. The fountain in front of the station is another must-see as it has a digital-style clock displaying the time using water to form the digits.

Ever seen a jungle in a train station? Head to Madrid's Atocha station, where you can check out its lush rainforest in an old cast-iron and glass building while you wait for your train leaving from the new terminal next door. The old terminal dates back to 1892 when it was redesigned by Alberto de Palacio Elissagne and Gustave Eiffel after a fire destroyed the original building. If relaxing among exotic trees and plants isn't enough, the historic building is also home to birds and turtles, shops, restaurants and a nightclub!


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