Moment motorist is temporarily blinded after snow plough covers windscreen

This snow plough certainly didn't make things easier for this motorist after he covered the car's windscreen in snow.

The scary clip shows the driver being tempoarily blinded.

The footage was filmed on the driver's dash-cam. The car is seen making its way down a snow-covered dual carriageway in Russia when a snow plough appears on the opposite side of the road.

As it passes the plough sprays a heavy blanket of snow onto the car's windscreen.

After a few terrifiyng moments, the wipers clear the view.

The footage has been viewed by thousands on LiveLeak, the Mirror reports.

The plough driver has been criticised by a number of viewers.

Winter weather around the world
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Moment motorist is temporarily blinded after snow plough covers windscreen
People throw snow balls near the Leaning Tower of Pisa and Piazza dei Miracoli covered with snow in December 2010 in Pisa, Italy.
Japanese macaque, commonly referred to as 'snow monkeys', react next to an open-air hot spring bath, or 'onsen' at the Jigokudani (Hell's Valley) Monkey Park in the town of Yamanouchi in Nagano prefecture, Japan in December 2012. Some 160 of the monkeys inhabit the area and are a popular tourist draw.
Autumn and winter collide as a snow storm moves into the Colorado mountains near Idaho Springs, USA in October 2013. The mountain could see up to a foot of snow from the storm.
Snow-covered Paris still attracts window shoppers as a heavy December snow blankets the French city.
Spending christmas in Finland, Kai Kubierske from Bonn in Germany gets out after swimming in a hole made in the ice at the Gulf of Finland in December 2012 in Lauttasaari, Helsinki.
People enjoy the winter weather on a beach in Biarritz, southwestern France in December 2012 as the temperature reached 22 C.
Friends enjoy sledging on Brecon Beacons, Wales, where snow settled in January 2012.
Deer in the snow at Whitworth Hall Country Park, County Durham as the winter weather continued across the UK in January 2013.
People make their way along the Great Wall of China at Badaling north of Beijing following a night of snowfall in February 2010. A blanket of snow whitened Tiananmen Square and northern sections of the Great Wall overnight in the latest round of freezing weather during the often bitter Chinese winter.
A father and his son slide over snow at the Trocadero Square near the Eiffel Tower in Paris, France in December 2010.
A man runs across the Brooklyn Bridge following a major winter storm in February 2013 in New York City, USA.
Alaskan Huskies eagerly howl at Villmarkssenter wilderness centre on Kvaloya Island, Tromso in Arctic Circle Northern Norway.
The Aurora Borealis over Fjord Grundarfjorour in February 2011 in Snaefellsnes, Iceland. The incredible aurora image may fool you into thinking they were taken in broad daylight. Kerstin Langenberger spent 300 hours chasing The Aurora Borealis by full moon to capture this rarely seen image.
A man shovels snow near the giant icicles on a rock in central Tbilisi, Georgia in February 2012. The temperatures in Georgia's capital dropped to -6C.
A couple climb onto a Soviet era monument dedicated to the Russia and Ukraine union in Kiev, Ukraine in February 2012.
Tourists walk through Voskresenskiye (Resurrection) Gates as they leave the Red Square in Moscow, Russia in March 2013, with landmark St.Basil's cathedral rising in the background.
People walk on Galata Bridge covered with snow in Istanbul, Turkey in January 2013.
Families enjoy the snow in the Stormont estate in Belfast.
Sheep grazing in deep snow in a field outside Dunleer, Co Meath, Ireland.
A couple walks on the snow-covered Strandbad Wannsee beach during its opening for the year in March 2013 in Berlin, Germany.
The sculpture Cloud Gate, commonly known as 'The Bean', is covered in snow in March 2013 in Chicago, USA.
A Palestinian man walks near palm trees as snow falls in Jerusalem's old city in January 2013. Jerusalem was transformed into a winter wonderland after heavy overnight snowfall turned the Holy City and much of the region white, bringing hordes of excited children onto the streets.
The Cibeles statue stands covered in snow and ice after snowfall in Madrid in January 2010.
Snow covers typical Dutch scenery in the centre of Amsterdam, Netherlands in February 2012.
Richard and Samantha Stretton from Newcastle enjoy a walk at the Angel of the North in Gateshead, UK after heavy snowfall.
A woman walks on the snow covered beach in Palma, Mallorca in Spain in February 2012.
Boats are seen trapped on the frozen lake of Kastoria town in northwestern Greece in February 2012.
Bathers enjoy naturally warmed spa water as they relax in the rooftop pool of the Thermae Bath Spa, Britain's only natural thermal spa, in Bath, England surrounded by winter snow.
The biggest Hungarian icebreaker for rivers, the 40-metre-long Szechenyi, navigates through the ice-covered waters of the Danube River nearby the parliament building in Budapest in February 2012.
The snow covered fields and villages in the Bhaderwah Valley, around 200km east of Jammu, India in December 2012.
20-year-old women dressed in kimono walk on a snow covered street to attend a coming-of-age ceremony in Tokyo in January 2013.
A young Bennet kangaroo sits in the pouch of its mother in the zoo in Stralsund, northern Germany in March 2013.
Snow and ice settle in at the base of Niagara Falls in Canada, where the largest ice bridge in two years has formed under the transforming touch of winter.

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The world's most dangerous roads
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Moment motorist is temporarily blinded after snow plough covers windscreen

North Yungas Road, or Death Road as it's also known, is legendary for its extreme danger. In 1995 it was named the "world's most dangerous road" by the Inter-American Development Bank. The 61km road leads from La Paz to Coroico in Bolivia. Up to 300 travellers are estimated to be killed on the road each year and cross markings along it show where vehicles have fallen. What makes it so dangerous? It's a single-lane road with no guard rails and cliffs up of 600ft. During rainy season, rain and fog severely hampers visibility and the road quickly becomes a muddy track. In the summer, there are rockfalls and dust limiting visibility. If you dare take your eyes off of the road, the rainforest scenery is breathtaking and and thousands of thrill-seekers, particularly mountain bikers, ride it each year.

In Alaska, the James Dalton Highway is a 414-mile gravel road that certainly wasn't built for normal cars. Drivers braving the road share it with huge lorries that kick up clouds of dust or mud and reduce visibility. Then there are potholes taking a heavy toll on cars and virtually nowhere to stop for petrol. We wouldn't recommend driving the Dalton unless you have a 4x4, extra fuel, food, spare tires and blankets to survive the cold.

It takes someone brave to drive or walk along this terrifying 'cliff corridor' road in China's Henan Province. The 1,250m long Guoliang Tunnel was chiselled and hammered out of the mountain 40 years ago by 14 villagers from the nearby Guoliang village. It is five metres high and four metres wide and placed 110 meters up the cliff face. Along the tunnel there are 35 window-sized holes, from which rock was dumped during the construction process and now show the beautiful views from the road.

The A537 between Macclesfield and Buxton was named the most dangerous road in Britain, based on the number of serious collisions. Punishing bends, steep drops from the highway and sheer rock face for most of its length make the A537 a scary drive. Most crashes take place during the weekends in the summer - a popular time for tourists who are most probably checking out the stunning Peak District scenery than keeping their eyes fixed on the road in front of them.

This mountain road in western Norway offers drivers a dizzying view of sheer mountainsides, deep fjords, waterfalls and fertile valleys. The Trollstigen Mountain Road has a steep incline of nine per cent and consists of 11 hairpin bends. Encircling the road are lofty mountains with majestic names such as Kongen (the King), Dronningen (the Queen) and Bispen (the Bishop). At the 700-metre plateau is a car park and a number of viewing platforms overlooking the bends and the Stigfossen waterfall.

The M56 Lena Highway, or the Amur-Yakutsk Highway, in Russia runs parallel to the incomplete Amur Yakutsk Mainline railway and although it is a federal highway, it's actually just a dirt road. When it is frozen in the winter it makes an excellent surface, but in the summer, any significant rain makes the road turn to mud, often swallowing small vehicles whole! On the Lena Highway, traffic jams last for weeks and become a mess of vehicles stuck in the middle of nowhere.

The second highest paved road in Romania was built as a military route and consists of 90km of twists and turns running north to south across the Southern Carpathians. Due to snowfall, the Transfagarasan is open just a few months of the year, and even in June snow can block the roads. The scenery is spectacular and includes the twisted monastery at Curtea de Arges, the Dracula Castle ruins at Poienari and the huge Vidraru Dam.

Italy's Stelvio Pass in the Ortler Alps is the highest paved mountain pass in the Eastern Alps and may not be the most dangerous road in the world, but is said to be one of the most thrilling. At 9,045 feet this famed road features 48 hairpin turns on the northern side and 12 on the southern side, taking you through stunning Alpine scenery and many kilometres of fast and sweeping roads. If you own a bike, this road was built for you.

Connecting China and Pakistan across the Karakoram mountain range, the Karakoram Highway is the highest paved international road in the world with an altitude of 15,395ft. Known informally as the KKH, it is often referred to as the ninth wonder of the world due to its high elevation and the difficult condition in which it was constructed. Drivers on the highway are troubled with landslides, floods and mud. More than 1,000 workers were killed during the building of the highway.

This road in New Zealand is as narrow as they come and was cut in the middle of a sheer cliff face 140 years ago, making it unbelievably scary. Constructed to give miners access to a gold-rich canyon, today Skippers Canyon Road's motorists must apply for a permit before attempting to tackle it. Most car insurance companies won't cover you in the event of an accident and the soft rock crumbles easily under car tires, getting slippery when wet too.

If having to be cautious of other motorists wasn't enough, on Gibraltar's Winston Churchill Avenue you have to watch out for planes too. The road cuts through the airport, used by passenger and military planes alike. It's the only road connecting Gibraltar to Spain and is by far, Gibraltar's busiest road so there's no escaping the drive among jumbo jets if you want to enter or exit the territory by road. Every time an aircraft lands, the road is closed for a few minutes and railroad-style crossing gates hold back the cars.


Reporter Almost Taken Out by Snow Plough
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