30 gold bars worth £10,000 buried on Folkestone beach

30 gold bars worth £10k buried on Folkestone beach

An artist has buried 30 gold bars on Folkestone beach - and has invited treasure hunters to dig it up after the tide goes out.

The bullion was buried on Outer Harbour beach in Folkestone, Kent, as part of a piece of participatory artwork by German artist Michael Sailstorfer called Folkestone Digs.

The tide goes out after 4pm, and anyone that finds the treasure can keep it.

It is not a small beach, however, so it may take a few days for all the gold bullion to be found.

According to the Metro, curator Lewis Biggs said: "It is a participatory artwork. It is about people coming to the beach and digging and possibly finding hidden treasure. Some people will get lucky, some people will not get lucky – and that's life."

He added: "I think we might well have a lot of people."

The Folkestone Digs project is part of the town's triennial arts festival.

The BBC reports that the event takes place every three years and runs from 30 August to 2 November.

This year, it will also feature work by Yoko Ono among over 20 other artists.

According to the Guardian, Biggs said the work raised intriguing questions about what people would do with the gold if they found any.

"An interesting part of the art work is considering whether it is going to be worth more as an art work," he said. "Do you take it to the pawnbrokers or do you take it to Sotheby's? Or do you keep it on the mantlepiece because you think it is going to be worth more later? Will its price increase as an artwork or as a piece of gold?"

The bars are of different sizes and could be worth several hundred pounds if found.

Let the gold rush commence!

Caribbean-esque beaches in Britain
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30 gold bars worth £10,000 buried on Folkestone beach
Saint Lucia? This is Vatersay beach in Scotland's Outer Hebrides, the southern-most inhabited island and one of the most scenic and beautiful in the archipelago. With vast white sandy beaches and turquoise waters comparable to those found in the Caribbean, time spent on this idyllic island will be memorable for a long time to come. It has great views towards the now uninhabited islands of Sandray, Pabbay and Mingulay and is home to some of the largest colonies of seabirds including razorbill, gannet, guillemot and puffin.

The crystal clear water at Port Gaverne near Port Isaac could be easily mistaken for a Caribbean beach. The sheltered, narrow cove has plenty of sand at low tide and may be the quaintest cove in North Cornwall nestling in under the cliffs. At high tide, it is an excellent diving spot and the sunset is as dreamy as you'll find in Antigua.

Wow! Look at that powder white sand. It could be mistaken for a secluded spot in the Virgin Islands, but this stunning stretch of sand is in Shetland. The Sands of Breckon is a white sand beach in the North of Yell, which has the largest area of shell sand dune and dune grassland in Shetland. The beautiful blue flag beach is sheltered from the prevailing south-westerly winds and provides a wonderful view of the sunset over the Atlantic Ocean.
This breathtaking beach in Wales reminds us of the idyllic sands of St Barts or Grenada. Harlech’s huge, peaceful beach is not just flat sand – the beautiful sand dunes here are a prized feature, the reason behind the area’s designation as a National Nature Reserve and Site of Special Scientific Interest. The beach is an ideal place for children to play and an even better spot for adults to sit back and relax. Near the beach there’s a shop, café and the internationally famous Royal St David’s Golf Club, one of Britain’s finest links courses.
This spectacular sandy beach forms a white arc between two headlands on the North Antrim coast. In this secluded location, even on a busy day there is plenty of room for quiet relaxation. Whitepark Bay is backed by ancient dunes that provide a range of rich habitats for bird and animal life. The Caribbean-esque beach has a golden stretch of sand, perfect for lazy summer days, picnic and long walks.
Rhossili Bay boasts a three-mile sandy beach, overlooked by National Trust holiday cottage, the Old Rectory. Visible on the beach at low tide are the remains of the Helvetia, a ship wrecked in 1887. From the top of Rhossili Down, the highest point on Gower, views of the peninsula can be seen as well as across the sea to West Wales, Lundy Island and the north Devon coast. The stunning beach fought off competition from many beaches in the Caribbean to be named one of the world's best in a 2013 TripAdvisor survey.
Secluded Kynance Cove on Cornwall's Lizard Peninsula is considered one of the most beautiful beaches in the world - and you can see why! Its defining features are the serpentine rock formations with a distinctive pinnacle to the north of the beach. The beautiful beach, with its Caribbean-style sand and crystal clear water is one of Cornwall's most photographed spots.
A small bay backed by dunes and pine trees, accessible only by a half-mile walk from the nearest car park, Barafundle Bay has been voted many times as one of the best beaches in Britain and the world. Swathes of golden sand and crystal clear waters, it is often likened to a Caribbean beach. If you're looking for an isolated spot, this pristine beach is the place and has no facilities.
The beaches on small Outer Hebridean island Berneray are so beautiful that one was once mistakenly used in a campaign by the Thailand Tourist Board to promote the Asian country's beaches! The picturesque West Beach (pictured) is a three-mile stretch of machair bordered by white sand.
The superb tidal sands and beautiful shallow lagoons at Pedn Voudner in Treen make it a fantastic option for beachgoers looking for a taste of the Caribbean. Set between Logan Rock and Porthcurno, the beach is accessible by boat or from the coasta foot path along the cliffs. It is also an unofficial naturist beach - the perfect spot to strip off!
A favourite among locals and visitors, Portrush Whiterocks Beach is famed for its limestone cliffs, grassy knolls and incredible views. The sandy beach is a popular place for surfing and bodyboarding, and is home to a labyrinth of specatacular caves and arches including Shelagh's Head, the Wishing Arch and Lion's Paw.
Running from the pier at Ballycastle Marina at the western end to Pans Rock in the east, Ballycastle Beach is a fabulous 1.2km beach with beautiful sand and some shingle. A lovely spot for bathing and walking, in the distance you can see the Pans Rocks rock formation jutting out into the sea and the hidden Devil's Churn, with its underwater sea tunnel.
With its white sand and turquoise waters, Alchmelvich is a pretty beach popular for water skiing and kayaking. In the summer you can spot porpoisess swimming and the blue flag beach attracts fishermen, with cod, haddock, whiting, pollack, saithe and mackerel being common catches.
Described by visitors as a paradise, Porthcurno, located in the far west of Cornwall is famed for its gorgeous fine soft white sand washed by a sea that turns turquoise in the sun and high cliffs on both sides. The oasis of stunning natural beauty is popular with families and has a stream that flows down one side.

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