Apple retains coolest brand title

AppleApple has retained its title as the coolest brand in Britain while big luxury names have pushed everyday products out of favour, according to an annual survey.

The CoolBrands list has Aston Martin and Rolex in second and third place, as voted by 3,000 consumers and a panel of 38 "key influencers" such as television chef Gizzi Erskine and model Daisy Lowe.
Everyday brands that dominated last year's top 20, such as Haagen-Dazs, Ben & Jerry's and Vogue, dropped down the ranking to be replaced by luxury names including Chanel (13), Prada (14) and Alexander McQueen (19).

Nike took fourth place, followed by Glastonbury and YouTube, while Google and Twitter both dropped from their place in last year's top five to seventh and eighth places respectively.

BBC iPlayer also dropped from last year's sixth position to 16, Skype fell out of the top 20 altogether, while music streaming service Spotify is the only new digital entry at 20.

Both Selfridges and Liberty failed to place within the top 20, having featured at 14 and 10 last year, meaning no retailers made the top group.

Stephen Cheliotis, chairman of the CoolBrands council, said: "While Apple remained number one this year, question marks remain as to how long they might hold this position in the face of an increasingly competitive set of rivals.

"Overall the top 20 saw a definite swing back to luxury brands as the affordable everyday brands slipped back.

"Fashion brands came back to the fore, with sport and music brands becoming more conspicuous.

"Whether it's due to strong heritage, product quality or quite simply a correlation with the reviving British economy, this year's CoolBrands list shows an increasing number of luxury brands are back at the top of the cool list, reversing last years' trend of affordable everyday luxuries dominating."

The official CoolBrands top 10 are:

1 Apple
2 Aston Martin
3 Rolex
4 Nike
5 Glastonbury
6 YouTube
7 Google
8 Twitter
9 Virgin Atlantic
10 Ray-Ban.

Top advertising icons that are no more
See Gallery
Apple retains coolest brand title

The lone cowboy quadrupled sales of Philip Morris' Marlboro cigarettes when he first appeared in the 1950s. Despite increasing evidence from mid-century scientists of health risks associated with smoking, Marlboro Man was influential in persuading the public to continue to light up.

Remember the little mascots for Robertson's jam? People sent away in their millions to the jam makers for golly brooches and other golly-related memorabilia. When Golly retired in 2002, the official reason was that children had lost interest in him. But many suspected the forces of political correctness were at play. Over 20m gollies were sent out by Robertson's in their heyday. Many have become valued collectors' items.

A boy and girl in ragged clothes catch the smell of Bisto gravy on the breeze and sigh longingly "Ahhh... Bisto." The advert, drawn by cartoonist Wilf Owen, first appeared in 1919. The gambit aimed to capture an 'Oliver Twist' quality, appealing to the 'urchin' segment of the working class market.

The yellow talking cartoon bird made his calls to advertise Post Office Telecommunications (now BT) perched on telephone wires. His catchphrase was "Make someone happy with a phone call". Bernard Cribbens provided the voice.

Beatrice Bellman was a popular character from a series of TV adverts by British Telecom, famously played by Maureen Lipman. She was a stereotypical Jewish mother and grandmother, with a heart of gold. Her adventures mostly involved nagging her long-suffering family over the phone. The name Beattie was a play on 'BT', as British Telecom later became known.

Any BP ad showing green fields and clean seas. Nowadays inappropriate for reasons too obvious to outline here.

Toilet paper makers Andrex have chosen to digitise their iconic puppy for the first time since the dog hit our screens in 1972. The series of more than 120 adverts featuring a live puppy made even something as utilitarian as toilet paper appear cute - no mean feat.

A blue floating shost-like creature with a long pointed nose, he featured in an educational animation programme created by Nick Spargo for British Gas in 1975. Willo's job was to extol the virtues of gas. Actor Kenneth Williams provided the voice. Willo later went on to great success in his own TV series, before retiring into obscurity.

Read Full Story