32 emergency workers free 20 stone man from car wreck

32 emergency workers free 20 stone man from car wreck

A 20 stone man was trapped in his car for more than hour following a collision with a bus, as 32 emergency workers attempted to rescue him from the wreckage.

The middle-aged man, thought to be from West Sussex, was injured when his Mercedes-Benz crashed into the back of a bus on the A29 in Adversane, near Billingshurst.> The rescue operation, which involved 18 firefighters, eight police officers and six paramedics, is thought to have cost an astonishing £20,000.

Emergency staff from Sussex Police, West Sussex Fire and Rescue Service and South East Coast Ambulance Service reached the scene at roughly 6.30pm. The A29 was closed to allow firefighters to remove the driver's door from the Mercedes-Benz.

32 emergency workers free 20 stone man from car wreck


After freeing the driver from the wreckage, the emergency services staff had to transfer the obese driver to a specialist bariatric ambulance, which is designed to carry overweight patients weighing up to 50 stone.

Bariatric ambulances cost £400,000 and are equipped with wider lifting equipment and specialist handling aids to cope with heavier patients. In total, two bariatric ambulances, two ambulance cars and a standard ambulance attended the scene.

Paramedics treated the driver before he was taken to Royal Sussex County Hospital in Brighton. He had suffered an open fracture to his ankle and also complained of both chest and abdominal pains.

Watch commander at Storrington police service, Martin McKilligin, told the Mail Online: "Because the gentleman was bariatric, or overweight, in size it gave us some problems.

"We needed to make sure the we could get full access to him so we could safely remove him. He was conscious throughout and coped very well with what was a very stressful situation."

The rear-impact also caused another man, boarding the bus at the time of the incident, to be thrown from the bus's steps. His injuries are not thought to be serious.
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