Tesco branch bans scantily-clad shoppers

Tesco


A Tesco branch in Tiverton, Devon, has banned scantily-clad people from coming into the shop. Women will be made to cover up and men will be required to wear a shirt.

But why have they done this, and is this the first shop with a dress code?
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The ban

The store was forced to issue the ban after receiving complaints from other shoppers during the recent warm spell.

According to the Mirror, Tesco said that the amount of flesh on show was embarrassing other shoppers, and that shirtless shoppers were breaching health and safety regulations, because they could drip sweat onto the produce.

A spokesperson told the Daily Mail: "As we see glimpses of the summer weather, we've decided that it's sensible to ask customers to wear t-shirts and footwear in store. We don't want them to tread on anything sharp and we want all of our customers to feel comfortable." He said the move was in response to customer complaints.

It has posted a notice in the window informing shoppers of the ban, It says: "To avoid causing offence or embarrassment to others, as well as for health and safety reasons, we ask that customers are appropriately dressed when visiting our stores. Shirts, tops and shoes must be worn at all times."

Dress codes

It's not the first store with a dress code. In fact Tesco in St Mellon, Cardiff, issued a ban on shoppers showing up in their pyjamas in 2010. The store said at the time it was in response to customer complaints.

And while there were plenty of people who were stunned that enough shoppers showed up in their pyjamas to make a dress code necessary, the awaiting media caught one being refused entry on the first day of the ban.

The most famous store with a dress code is Harrods, which introduced one in the late 1980s, outlawing beach-wear, cycling or running kit, flips flops or thong sandals, bare midriffs, or dirty clothes. It says this is to ensure shopping in the store is: "pleasurable in every respect."

It famously threw Kylie Minogue and Jason Donovan out in the early 1990s for being too scruffy, and hit the headlines in 2010 for throwing out two runners who popped in for a bottle of water mid-run.

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Tesco branch bans scantily-clad shoppers

The N-Dubz singer was allegedly caught fixing up a drug deal between an undercover Sun reporter and her dealer friend and part-time rapper Mike GLC.

The illegal activity is likely to cost Tulisa dearly as she has cashed in on her youth appeal through the story of her troubled background and claims to have shunned drugs to grow her music career.

The modern day sporting hero and winner of seven consecutive Tour de France competitions saw his reputation plummet last year when he was found guilty of doping and cheating his way through is career.

Armstrong was stripped of all his titles, ordered to return his prize money, and sponsors couldn't drop him quick enough. He is also being sued by teammates. It is estimated that it will cost him $125m.

After possibly one of biggest public meltdowns in history, the actor lost it with the creator of his TV series Two and a Half Men. His outburst together with outlandish behavior including alleged drug benders, porn stars and drink problems, lead to Sheen being fired from the show. He reportedly earned $1.25m per episode, meaning he lost $36m for the whole season.

At the height of her short career, teen star Lohan was commanding around $7.5m per movie at four movies per year. Yet the pressures of fame at a young age got to The Parent Trap and Mean Girls star, seeing her life spiral out of control as she became embroiled in allegations of drug and alcohol abuse, jewellery theft, and drunk driving. Her earnings quickly plummeted and remain he doldrums.

Singer Chris Brown's reputation became muddied in 2009 amid allegations of assault against his then girlfriend, pop diva Rhianna.

The alleged offense took place the night before both stars were set to perform at the 2009 Grammy Awards. Brown's arrest on felony charges and the brutal images of Rhianna's battered face, led to an huge media frenzy. Overnight, Brown went from whiter-than-white Wrigley's gum and milk spokesperson to the most loathed man in music.

Fashions favourite supermodel could do no wrong until she appeared in the Daily Mirror in 2005 snorting "line after line" of cocaine at a recording studio with then-boyfriend and known drug addict, Pete Doherty.

Dubbed 'Cocaine Kate' by the press, Chanel promptly dropped Moss from their advertising, as did fashion house Burberry and Swedish brand H&M. But Moss managed to recover quickly from the scandal and is now the face of Rimmel, Dior and Mango.

Infidelity cost the golf star more than his marriage and a staggering $100 million divorce settlement – shaving brand Gillette was one of many brands to pull its endorsements following the incident in 2009. Woods also lost deals with Gatorade, AT&T and Accenture following the scandal.

Photos of the Olympic swimmer smoking a marijuana pipe saw Kellogg's pull its sponsorship of the sports star to protect their brand images. Phelps also received a suspension from competition and USA Swimming pulled financial support for three months.

Brazilian footballer Ronaldinho was axed from his Coca-Cola sponsorship deal after appearing with a can of Pepsi during a press conference at Atletico Minerio. The mistake cost the star £1 million in unpaid earnings as his £500,000 per-year contract was set to run until 2014.

While serving as president, Bill Clinton became embroiled in an embarrassing high profile scandal that looked set to cost him his career. The former president was accused of having sexual relations with intern Monica Lewinsky and harassment charges against Paula Jones.

Clinton was acquitted of perjury and obstruction of justice charges and made a public apology, which only served to strengthen his reputation. He went on to serve two presidency terms and left the office with the highest end-of-office approval rating of any U.S. president since World War II.

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A more recent customer dress code was implemented in the US, where banks in part of Florida have introduced rules in order to tackle a spate of recent robberies. Customers cannot enter if they are wearing a hat, hood or shades. The Florida Bankers Association said it introduced something similar five years ago, and saw the number of robberies plummet.

We have become used to pubs, restaurants and clubs operating a dress code. The question is whether more shops ought to bring them in too? What do you think? let us know in the comments.

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Tesco branch bans scantily-clad shoppers

One of the most popular glitches, was a wine deal at Tesco back in November 2012, where a series of offers clashed, leaving a bottle of £9.99 wine selling for £1.50.

The 'three wines for £10' deal apparently clashed with a '25% off when you buy six or more bottles' deal. The 25% was accidentally taken off the original price rather than the reduced one, leaving the wine at rock bottom prices. Deal-hunters cleared the shelves around the country.

Perhaps the most popular glitch from Tesco came in June 2011, when instead of taking £4 off the cost of a £20 case of beer, the supermarket accidentally started selling the cases for £4. The ensuring rush was nicknamed the 'beer stampede'.

Sadly not every supermarket pricing glitch comes with such a happy ending for consumers. In March last year the bargain-hunters thought their luck was in, when Tesco accidentally priced the new iPad at just £44.99 instead of around £650. Sadly it spotted the mistake before shipping the goods. The small print on its website meant it could refuse to sell at this price, and refund their customers instead.

In September 2012, Asda was responsible for one of the most expensive glitches. The Asda Price Guarantee offered vouchers to customers who could have got their shopping cheaper elsewhere.

However, when certain trigger products were in the basket, the supermarket massively under-priced the shopping at other supermarkets, and offered huge vouchers to shoppers. In many instances the vouchers came to roughly the same as the cost of the shopping.

In April, a mistake on their website resulted in Tesco selling 8 packs of Bulmers cider 568ml bottles for £5 - rather than a six pack for £8.

Deal-hunters snapped up the deal online, and had varying degrees of success. Some had their order delivered in full, others had six delivered for £5 - and were able to negotiate their way to another two, while others were offered six for £5 or their money back.

October last year saw one of the most famous glitches, when Tesco Terry's Chocolate Oranges were subject to two deals at the same time, and the price dropped from £2.75 to 29p. There were plenty of people getting chocolate oranges last Christmas.

A buy-one-get-one-free deal went awry at Tesco in March. People putting four tubs of I can't Believe It's Not Butter or Oykos yogurt packs into the trolley were only being charged for one.

Soon the online deal-hunting community was in action, with one person bagging 50 tubs of butter and 22 pots of yogurt for £8.79 - a saving of £133.89.

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