£100,000 bonus for Channel 4 boss

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ParalympicsChannel 4 chief executive David Abraham received a £100,000 bonus last year, partly thanks to the success of the Paralympics.

The bonus was paid on top of Mr Abraham's £515,000 salary, and with benefits of £129,000 he received a total of £744,000, compared with £701,000 in 2011.


Mr Abraham's salary is higher than that of BBC director general Lord Hall, who is paid £450,000 a year.

The figures, revealed in Channel 4's annual report, show that the broadcaster's chief creative officer Jay Hunt's total pay went up from £487,000 in 2011 to £542,000, including bonuses of £116,000.
A one-off reward, amounting to 2.5% of the total bonus, was paid to all staff on account of the broadcaster's Bafta-winning coverage of the Paralympics, which was watched by almost 40 million people.

Total aggregate gross salaries went up from £37 million to £55 million at the main channel, Channel 4, while at the Channel 4 group it increased from £52 million to £55 million.

The commercially funded, not-for-profit broadcaster said that total content spend was £608 million - up 3% - for the year. Spending on originated content across all Channel 4 services reached £434 million, up 4% from the last year.

Channel 4 reported a loss of £29 million for 2012 while the Channel 4 group reported a £27 million loss, as part of a planned programme of investment.

Channel 4 chairman Lord Burns said: "The board is very pleased with the creative performance in 2012. Of course the Paralympics stand out, not only as a highlight of the year but in Channel 4's entire history. They exemplify much of what Channel 4 was originally established to do and what it continues to stand for today.

He said of the financial rewards: "The committee seeks to balance (the need to) reward commercial success while being sensitive to the position that Channel 4 occupies as a publicly-owned organisation." He said success had taken place "against a very tough economic climate" and that changes in executive pay were "relatively small".