Revealed! The UK's top ten islands

Revealed! The UK's top ten islands


TripAdvisor has revealed the UK's top ten islands in its 2013 Travellers Choice Awards - and they're a feast for the eyes. From the craggy tip of the Hebrides to the golden shorelines of Jersey, these were voted into the top ten. Have a look at our gallery below and tell us if you agree...

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The UK's most beautiful islands (according to Tripadvisor)
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Revealed! The UK's top ten islands

60 miles of unspoilt scenery, a wealth of history, one of the best music festivals out there and only a hop away on the ferry, what more could you want from the Isle of Wight? It also boasts some heavyweight gastronomy: foodies should visit the only Michelin-starred restaurant on the island: Robert Thompson's The Hambrough in Ventnor by the sea. 

Anglesey is a Welsh feast of towering cliffs, dunes, salt marshes, coastal heaths and sublime seascapes. Take it all in by wandering, cycling or riding the 125 mile coastal path that winds around 95 per cent of the island. If you can't tear yourself away from the sea then stay at the Anglesey Waters Edge, a converted B&B with a four-poster bed. 

Sitting between England and Ireland, with its acres of green pastures and low population numbers, this Isle of Man is known for its beauty as well as its golfing facilities. There are nine golf courses, all surrounded by panoramic views, squeezed onto this relatively small island and you can play them all with isleofmangolftours.com.

One of the most southerly of the Scottish islands, Arran seems to have it all: pretty villages, rugged coastline, towering mountains and dense woodland. And it's the perfect place to sample Scotland's national drink. The Arran Malt distillery had been brewing single-malt since 1995 and visitors can take a tour of the distillery that starts with an introduction to the whiskey making process and ends with some essential sampling of the produce.

Spot dolphins and whales off the coastline, red deer in the hills and eagles and buzzards in the vast, moody skies: no surprises that this Hebridean gem makes the top five most beautiful isles. Top tip: Make sure you MacCulloch's Fossil Tree, an amazing standing fossil of a 50 million year old conifer tree, preserved in lava.

Lewis and Harris, the most northerly islands in the Hebrides, are peppered with white beaches, grey rocks and sea lochs, as well as ancient monoliths, Iron Age constructions and the most impressive megalithic standing stones in Europe: the Callinish Standing Stones

Skye's complex network of bays, inlets and coves are fringed by jagged ridges and some of the oldest castles and keeps in Scotland. Visit the iconic Eilean Donan Castle, marooned on an island at the point where three lochs meet and surrounded by some of the most rugged and beautiful scenery in the Hebirdes. Did you know? You'll find sheepskin souvenirs aplenty here. At Skyeskyns, a traditional tannery, where you can watch the tanners making leather and buy everything sheepskin from ear muffs to mules.

Golden sands, wild flowers and unspoilt countryside are just some of the things that have us going back time and time again to this Channel Island. According to the Jersey meteorological department, the island is also the warmest place in the British Isles. Top tip: Jersey is one of the UK's prime spots for coasteering or Blokarting (land yachting along the beach).

Remote, windswept and heather-strewn: it's no surprise that the Orkneys took first place in the best island awards. The rolling hills of Orkney's mainland were first written about by Greek explorer Pytheas in 224BC on his voyage to the edge of the world and it's inspired visitors ever since. Did you know? The Orkneys are home to Europe's oldest standing house, the 5,500 year-old Knap of Howar on Papa Westray. Orkney is in the Guinness Book of Records for the world's shortest scheduled flight; Westray to Papa Westray, with a flying time of less than two minutes...

It may only be 12 miles long, but what Guernsey lacks in size it makes up for in scenery. Britain used to fight with their French neighbours over this strategically placed island jewel, but nowadays the only battle you'll face is where to eat. An English fish and chippie or a Parisienne-style cafe, perhaps? Top tip: The Farmhouse Hotel and Restaurant, a four-star boutique hotel in the picturesque Parish of St Saviours, offers traditional afternoon tea served with Perrier-Jouet champagne and lashings of Guernsey clotted cream.

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