SMMT: Cars are 25% more efficient than in 2000

SMMT: Cars are 25% more efficient than in 2000

CARS on sale in 2012 are over 25 per cent more efficient than those available in 2000, according to the SMMT.

Figures from the organisation suggest that average emissions were 133.1g/km in 2012 – some 26.5 per cent lower than the figure from 2000. What's more, sub-130g/km cars accounted for more than half the market in 2012 – compared with just 10.7 per cent in 2007.
Sub-100g/km vehicles shot up to an 8.2 per cent market share in 2012 too, up from 3.7 per cent in 2011. Diesel models were also at an all-time high, commanding 50.8 per cent of the market, while alternatively fuelled vehicles held 1.4 per cent.

The drop is likely to have been helped by the drive across the industry to fit cars not only with diesel engines, but smaller, turbocharged units – such as Fiat's TwinAir and Ford's EcoBoost.

Cars in almost all shapes and sizes saw a drop in comparative CO2 emissions, according to the SMMT's data, though larger vehicles saw the biggest drops. Executive and sports cars saw the biggest drops, shaving 25 and 24.7 per cent off their average emissions respectively.

Matthew Croucher, author of the report that outlined the data, highlighted the impressive changes that manufacturers have taken to reduce emissions.

"Industry can be proud of the progress it has made in reducing CO2 emissions and improving fuel efficiency by more than 25% since 2000," he said. 'The UK motor industry recognises its responsibilities and the industrial opportunities from the transition to ultra-low carbon vehicles.

"Future environmental and economic success will be determined by sustained investment in new technology, R&D, infrastructure and consumer incentives. We are seeing improvement in conventional technologies and the emergence of a range of alternative technologies, creating one of the most innovative periods for the global automotive industry."
Read Full Story