Video: Beaches closed as tiger sharks feed off dolphin carcass metres from shore

Roshina Jowaheer
Video: Beaches closed as tiger sharks feed just a feet from shore
Video: Beaches closed as tiger sharks feed just a feet from shore

CNN/Network Ten



Beaches in Perth were shut down yesterday as a group of sharks went on a feeding frenzy along Australia's West Coast.

Network Ten reported that more than a dozen tiger sharks circled just a foot from the shore as beachgoers witnessed the rare event.

Up to 16 sharks fed off a dolphin carcass from around 8.30am on Wednesday, just 20 metres from one of Perth's most popular beaches.

The sharks were between one and three metres in size.

Beach services coordinator John Snook told Network Ten: 'I can't recall off the top of my head seeing anything remotely like this - the sight of up to 16 sharks feeding within about 30 meters of the water's edge is truly amazing.'

Curious onlookers watched as the tiger sharks came so close to the shore you could see their stripes.

Community Safety manager with Surf Lifesaving WA, Chris Peck, told PerthNow that he believed the sharks had probably taken the dolphin and would move on after devouring it.

He said the sharks were between Trigg and Scarborough Beach at an area known locally as Contacio. Trigg and Scarborough beaches were closed immediately.

One onlooker said: 'It is pretty cool, especially how close they are, just to be able to stand on the beach. I could see the stripes on that.'

Another witness said: 'Scary, you know. One of them was as close in as if I was in there paddling really. I mean quite scary.'

According to WIVB.com, the sharks were around for at least three hours while fisheries and lifesavers monitored the situation.

Although tiger sharks have been known to attack humans, there hasn't been a deadly attack in Western Australia since 1930.


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