Pictures: Amazing Animal Photography Prize 2012 from ZSL

Pictures: Amazing Animal Photography Prize 2012 from ZSLLucy Ray/ZSL


The winners of this year's Zoological Society London Animal Photography Prize have been revealed - and their breathtaking images have gone on display in a stunning exhibition at ZSL London Zoo.

The competition, launched in April to inspire amateur and professional photographers to capture the wonders of the animal kingdom.

Shots include close-up of an Amur leopard baring its teeth, a curious gorilla getting behind the camera and a Madagascan giant leaf-tailed gecko showing off its incredible camouflage skills.

Project manager for the exhibition, Sarah Barron from ZSL, said: 'We've been blown away by the calibre of the images submitted for the ZSL Animal Photography Prize.

Other extraordinary pictures included a shot of a reflective gharial and an adorable gosling.

Browse some of the wonderful winning images from the competition below:

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ZSL Animal Photography Prize 2013
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Pictures: Amazing Animal Photography Prize 2012 from ZSL

'This photograph shows a very young Egyptian gosling. I remember sitting on the bus coming back home looking through the photos I’d taken and this one made me smile; it’s exactly how I wanted it. It means lying in marsh type land being completely drenched wasn’t for nothing!' Danielle Connor

'I chose the Amur Leopard bearing its teeth as it demonstrates its fierce nature and alluring eye contact towards the viewer, the tight crop adds a dramatic feel and brings out the raw emotion of the leopard. Look further into the image and you are confronted with the animals beautiful markings, eyes and whiskers.' Jason Brown

'I picked this image because I've always been fascinated by frogs, but most people I know really dislike them. When I first saw the frog on the leaf, I thought about how cute it was and I wanted to capture that to show others how beautiful frogs are. I was also struck by the size of it: I could have easily fit it on my thumb as it was so small!' Bex Saunders

'This photo captures an intimate encounter with a Giant leaf-tailed gecko (Uroplatus fimbriatus), an endemic species from the island of Madagascar. During the day, this superbly adapted animal flattens itself upside down against tree trunks and uses its effective camouflage to blend into the bark. The picture shows how every aspect of the animal’s body, including the head, the hands and the tail in the background, contribute to it being practically invisible. I like to think the view up the trunk gives an idea of what it must be like to spend days on end flattened against a tree.' Jeremy Cusack

'Chickaboo is a curious baby gorilla. She was fascinated by the camera and although she looks as though is taking a picture, she is actually looking at her  reflection in the back of the screen.' Lucy Ray

'This is a gharial (aka gavial), a critically endangered narrow-snouted crocodilian, reflected in shallow waters near sunset.' Robert Heischman

'This is an adult and calf manatee at sunrise. It was an amazing experience to be able to swim with and interact with these, frankly adorable, creatures.' Ibrahim Roushdi

'With the many insects in the world, we often forget how significant they are in our lives simply because they are small. But they are enormously varied, and often quite beautiful. This shot, at least for me, is meant to expose some of that beauty.' Jeremy Cai

'At first sight it’s not clear what the great mass of undulating lines in fact are. It takes a closer inspection for them to transform and the immense scale of what you behold to become reality. The blue whale is the largest creature ever to have existed on our planet.' Matthew Coutts

'I like birds and don't see Ostrich that often. I like the way this was looking and the way it was standing.' Celtic Meredith

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