Terror on Spanish beaches as mauve jellyfish invade

AOL Travel
Spanish beaches close as mauve jellyfish invade
Spanish beaches close as mauve jellyfish invade

SolarPix


Many of Spain's most popular beaches have been closed to tourists as huge numbers of the potent mauve stinger jellyfish invade the coast.

Holidaymakers have found themselves banned from the sea after the mauve stingers, which plagued the waters of the Costa Del Sol last month, are arriving back in huge numbers.

Lifeguards have taken the precautionary step of stopping swimmers from entering the water, and many beaches, which are normally packed with tourists, are out of bounds until further notice.

Last July, more than 1,000 tourists were stung by the jellyfish, and the Spanish tourism authorities have moved quickly to prevent similar attacks.

The creatures have tentacles up to 10ft (3m) long. Their nettle-like stings that last up to three days and in some cases they can leave permanent scarring.

Terror on Spanish beaches as mauve jellyfish invade
Terror on Spanish beaches as mauve jellyfish invade

PA

According to a report in the Metro, Spanish authorities are blaming the infestation on overfishing in the region which has resulted in the virtual disappearance natural predators such as turtles, tuna and swordfish.

Other possible causes include ocean currents and lack of rain, and high temperatures.

Poster campaigns across many beaches along the Costa Del Sol give warnings and advising holidaymakers to seek immediate medical attention if stung.

Mauve stingers, or plagia noctiluca, are the most venomous in the Mediterranean.



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