Olympics: the postcards fight back

Updated: 
Picture of postcardsSocial media looks set to be the main means of contact between people at the Olympics, says a release from mobile postcard start-up company Touchnote, but the postcards are fighting back.

There are new and entertaining ways of sending them and people are catching on - for example you can take a picture from your phone and have it delivered the following day.
The iPhone app is called Bypost and it simply lets you take a picture, fill in the address and a message and sends it - UK postcards cost 99p. The text appears typed and when I tried sending one from holiday a couple of weeks ago my brother put it in the recycling pile immediately, assuming it was junk.


The research says that 53% of American visitors will be Facebooking or Tweeting their favourite Olympic moments, known colloquially as "the ones where the Americans win". Of which there are quite a lot so far.

Several companies, however, are vying for the hard copy market.

Alternatives
Aside from the aforementioned app, Touchnote itself has an app which works on Android and iPhone and can be downloaded from the stores on either.

The good news for users of this app is that thanks to a deal with Samsung, which is acting as sponsor or 'bankroller' as you might call it, the service is actually making hundreds of postcards free - see this link for details.

Boris
This inevitably means that someone - we hope - will have taken a postcard picture of Boris Johnson suspended from a zipwire on Tuesday. We at AOL would love to see any such pictures as we find them quite endlessly if childishly entertaining.

Guy Clapperton is the author of "This Is Social Media".



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