The end of 'passenger action'? Rail companies fined for using jargon

The end of 'passenger action'? Rail companies fined for using jargon
The end of 'passenger action'? Rail companies fined for using jargon

PA


British train companies have been told to stop using jargon when informing passengers of cancellations and delays – or face huge fines.

The ruling from the Office of Rail Regulation was made after extensive research found that two-thirds of rail passengers believe delays are badly handled. No surprises there, then.

Among the most common gobbledegook excuses highlighted by passengers were:

"Passenger action" – translation: "someone has abused a member of staff" or " a passenger opened a door before it reached a station".

"Poor railhead adhesion" – translation: "the tracks are slippery".

"Signalling problems" – translation: "the signals are broken".

'Congestion' – translation: "the station is busy".

From February 2012, rail companies, Network Rail and station operators will have a 'fundamental obligation' to dispense with their gobbledegook. They will also have to send clear-worded explanations to passengers within ten minutes of an incident.

Will it work? Watch this space.

What are your experiences of jargon and gobledegook while travelling? Tell us your experiences below.

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