Air passengers will be forced to have body scans - or not allowed to fly

Updated: 

Air passengers will be forced to have body scans - or not allowed to fly
PA

Air passengers will NOT be allowed to opt out of X-ray style 'naked' body security scans - despite serious health fears that are currently being investigated by the European Union.

The controversial 'naked' airport scans have come under fierce criticism from many, including civil liberties groups. They are perceived as an invasion of privacy as they produce graphic images which make passengers appear 'naked' to the machine operator.

But there are also serious fears that they produce dangerous levels of radiation that have been linked with cancer.

Last week, these health concerns triggered the EU to ban all new trials of the machines until a safety report has been compiled.

The EU clearly states that "passengers are given the right to opt out from a control with scanners and be subject to an alternative method of screening."

But transport secretary Justine Greening said that passengers who were not willing to be scanned would not be allowed to fly.

She said that not allowing passengers to opt out from scanning was justified by the security threat to Britain, adding that the powers of the Aviation Security Act could be invoked to force passengers to be screened.

The scanners are used at many US airports as well as at Manchester Airport, Heathrow and Gatwick.

The worst airports in the world 2011

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