On a high: the photographer risking his life for amazing photos in Russia

Ruth Doherty
On a high: the photographer risking his life for amazing photos ini Russia
On a high: the photographer risking his life for amazing photos ini Russia

Caters


A teenager has been risking his life by scaling sky-high buildings to capture awe-inspiring photographs of the world below.

Russian student Marat Dupro, 19, has been risking his neck since he bought a Canon camera 18 months ago.

He kicked off by climbing on top of his own roof to take snaps, before moving on to heart-stopping heights on the edge of buildings and on top of pylons.

And the scariest bit? He doesn't even wear a safety harness.

On a high: the photographer risking his life for amazing photos ini Russia
On a high: the photographer risking his life for amazing photos ini Russia

Caters


According to the Daily Mail, he said: 'When I am on the roof I have a feeling that the whole world is by my feet.

'All my problems and trouble are left somewhere down below. The height exhilarates me.

'I wanted to try and get the most spectacular pictures I could - pictures like no one else had taken before.

'I began by taking pictures from my own roof, but soon I wanted to get bigger and better pictures.

'So I went with my friend to the top of a 33-storey building. It was about 120 metres high and we went right out to the edge and I started taking pictures.

'It was such a thrill, we couldn't wait to do it again.

'I've taken a lot of the photos by sneaking past guards and getting access to structures illegally.

'But I think the risks are worth it to take such amazing pictures.'

On a high: the photographer risking his life for amazing photos ini Russia
On a high: the photographer risking his life for amazing photos ini Russia

Caters


Marat doesn't go it alone, and is joined on his hair-raising photographic pursuits by a group of his friends, some of whom scaled one of Russia's seven Soviet skyscrapers together.

They've even been to the top of the Moscow Tower, one of the highest buildings in Europe.

Marat added: 'The building is 300 metres up in the air and it was really difficult to take photos because of the wind. I had to bend right over and just take a picture straight down.

'That was the most dangerous photo I have taken, it was pretty scary.'

Even though the pics are incredible, definitely don't try this at home...