The Indian village where residents 'grow' their own bridges

The Indian village where residents 'grow' their own bridgesRex


Deep in the rainforests of the Indian state of Meghalaya lie some of the most extraordinary pieces of civil engineering in the world.

Here, in the depths of the forest, bridges aren't built - they're grown.

With trailing vines and mosses, the living 'double decker' tree-bridges of Cherrapunji are breathtaking in their majesty.

The Indian village where residents 'grow' their own bridgesRex


Ancient tree vines and roots stretch across rivers and streams, creating a solid latticework structure that appears too fantastical to be real.

The Cherrapunji region is considered to be one of the wettest places on the planet and this is the reason behind the unusual bridges. With Cherrapunji receiving around 15 metres of rain per year, a normal wooden bridge would quickly rot.

This is why, 500 years ago, locals began to guide roots and vines from the native Ficus Elastica rubber tree across rivers using hollow bamboo until they became rooted on the opposite side – eventually creating a bridge.

Very clever, and very beautiful.
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