New York and Borough Market on 'endangered destinations' list

Ruth Doherty



Wanderlust magazine has released its annual 'endangered destinations' list - and New York found itself on it for the very first time.

The endangered list includes holiday hotspots that are in need of greater care or in danger of losing what once made them special - and how Brits can help.

New York has appeared this year after plans were announced to phase out its iconic yellow cabs, as well as the loss of the squeegee guys banned by the former mayor, and the fact that the Statue of Liberty is now less photographed than the Apple store on Fifth Avenue.

From Britain, London's Borough Market found itself on the list. Why? Visitors have swelled to 4.5 million a year and many tourists come purely to take pictures rather than spend money. In addition, major development work as part of the Thameslink Project is destroying the historic face of the market.

Lyn Hughes, editor-in-chief at Wanderlust said: 'Rapid development, booming visitor numbers and political strife are just some of the issues highlighted in our Endangered Destinations List 2011. We want to bring attention to the issues and urge British holidaymakers to travel with care in 2011.

'Tourism can be a double edged sword for destinations. At the same time as supporting local communities, if things aren't managed properly the negatives can soon outweigh the positives creating major environmental and cultural issues. Wadi Rum in Jordan is a case in point - it appears on our list for a second year in a row as uncontrolled tourism is fast threatening to spoil this unique destination.'

See the full Endangered Destinations List 2011:

Three Peaks Challenge
The challenge to ascend the three highest peaks in England, Wales and Scotland within 24 hours, often for charity, has become hugely popular. But in their rush to reach the summits of Snowdon, Scafell Pike and Ben Nevis, some participants leave litter, drive dangerously, disturb local residents' sleep and contribute little to local communities.

Borough Market
Visitors have swelled to 4.5 million a year and many tourists come purely to take pictures rather than spend money. In addition, major development work as part of the Thameslink Project is destroying the historic face of the market.

Wadi Rum, Jordan
Declared a World Heritage site by UNESCO in June 2011, Jordan's Wadi Rum valley has become an increasingly popular tourist spot but limited infrastructure has led to a lack of environmental protection.

Viyrunga National Park, Democratic Republic of Congo
Africa's oldest national park – home to more than one-fifth of the world's 700 critically endangered mountain gorillas – is at risk from armed militia, local politicians and proposed oil drilling.

Riga, Latvia
Hordes of rowdy British stags and hens descend on the World Heritage Site of Riga's city centre every weekend and are destroying the atmosphere of the historic centre.

Çoruh River, Turkey
The river is a white-water kayaking destination but water-sports-lovers can no longer navigate the entire river without portaging around two hydroelectric dams, with 11 more due to be constructed. The wildlife rich area surrounding the river would be dramatically changed by the plan.

Beijing Hutongs, China
Beijing's Hutongs, the old alleys of courtyard houses that have been part of the city's fabric since 1279, are disappearing at an alarming rate due to unchecked development.

Lamu, Kenya
Ancient dhows traversing the sleepy straits between Lamu and the Kenyan mainland could soon be jostling with cargo ships and oil tankers if the planned £16 million development turning Lamu into Kenya's second biggest deepwater harbour goes ahead.

Madagascar
The African island's unique fauna is under unprecedented threat from civil unrest, corruption and the overexploitation of resources. The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has declared the Malagasy ecosystem one of the most threatened in the world.

New York, USA
America's most iconic city is shedding its own icons at an alarming rate: its world-famous yellow cabs are being replaced by minivans, and the Statue of Liberty is now a less popular photo opportunity for visitors than the Apple Store on 5th Avenue.

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