Ten of the ugliest cars ever



Maybe we're being a bit cruel but we reckon these are the ugliest 10 cars to have been let loose on the road and some of them should have got no further than the proverbial drawing board.

They're certainly head-turners but for all the wrong reasons. See if you agree.
1. Chrysler PT Cruiser
One of the first retro-styled cars to be launched, the PT Cruiser was way past its sell by date when it died in 2008. Sadly, Chrysler's idea of American retro was ugly, but the strange convertible version that came along later was far worse. Driving it wasn't much better either.



2. Austin Princess
This wedge-shaped wonder was originally known as the Austin/Morris/Wolseley 18-22 and had "hydragas" suspension. Although Princess sales were initially strong, they soon tailed off because of quality and reliability issues. It was later re-born as the Ambassador, but this car failed to make its mark as it was too similar in concept to the Rover SDI.



3. Hummer
Arnold Schwarzenegger might have loved them, but the Hummer was the face of socially unacceptable off-roaders. Big, thirsty and rubbish in accidents the brand was finally pensioned off last year with the last H3 rolling off the line in May.



4. Ford Scorpio
The Scorpio was Ford's response to all those who thought that the Mark III Granada was dull, as its styling was at best controversial and at worst plain ugly. At the front, the Ford was fitted with bulbous headlights and an oval grille making the Scorpio look like an overgrown frog whilst the back is very American with rear lights arranged in a long strip. Ford never released the name of the designer and to this day maintain that the car outsold its expected figures.



5. Suzuki Wagon R+
The original Wagon R+ might be surprisingly roomy, economical and highly rated by owners but these owners don't have to look at their car when they're in them. In short, the tall styling looks ridiculous. Suzuki tried to smooth off the angular lines with the second-generation car that was also badged as the Vauxhall Agila, but it's still a car that only the quirky could love.



6. Subaru XT
The Subaru XT's extreme wedged aircraft-like design might have been very aerodynamic, but it was just too angular and odd to be attractive. Amazingly it lasted six years till 1991, mainly due to its four-wheel drive ability and reliability. Always a rare sight on British roads it was replaced by the equally odd SVX.



7. Austin Allegro Vanden Plas
Why British Leyland thought that adding a Rolls-style grille to the visually challenged Allegro was a good idea, no one knows. It might have been more luxurious with the leather and wood interior, but it's generally thought not to be a patch on its predecessor, the Austin 1100.



8. Ssangyong Rodius
Let's be honest, there's not a good angle to be found on the Rodius. From the huge grille to the squared-off rear and odd rear-window treatment, the Rodius is not pretty. Ssangyong claim that the styling will attract attention everywhere it goes and they're not wrong. Still, it's huge inside, seating seven in comfort and reliable with its Mercedes-sourced diesel engine and five-speed automatic transmission.



9. Fiat Multipla
The first-generation car was probably one of the weirdest-looking cars on the road. The frog-like, twin front headlights and bloated look to the dimensions were certainly distinctive. It was equally weird on the inside too, with the gear lever and handbrake moved from the floor to ease walk-through access. Like it or loath it, it seated six in comfort and their luggage; not many other cars could do this at the time and interior quality was above average.



10. Toyota Corolla
The eighth-generation Corolla might look less bland than previous models but it could never be called pretty. The best way to describe the Corolla's nose was that it resembled a frog that had swallowed a box. Reliability and quality was excellent as usual and the Corolla World Rally Car gave it more credibility. Still, it didn't stop Toyota toning the styling down in a 2000 re-style.

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