UK braces for Arctic blast with SNOW and icy temperatures

Freezing gales to usher in the May Day Bank Holiday

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Credits: Met Office

The UK is set for a 'major' Arctic blast - on its way over from Iceland - meaning wintry showers, frost and even SNOW could be a possibility.

From early next week, the dry spring we've enjoyed will disappear, leaving icy gales to see us into the May Day bank holiday.

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Temperatures could plummet next week, with daytimes struggling to get into double figures.

During the night, some areas of the UK may experience extreme cold, with thermometers dropping to -6C - colder than Iceland.

Credits: Met Office

Forecasters are warning that the predictions for the upcoming bank holiday may change, but it will be a far cry from the hottest April 9 in Britain since records began in the 1850s.

Temperatures hit a massive 25.5C, although have been gradually declining ever since.

Credits: Met Office

The Met Office's Alex Deakin says: "The cold air is coming down from the Arctic [early next week], across Iceland.

Credits: PA

"Fast forward to Tuesday [April 25], and that colder air has pushed right across the UK."

"There is a suggestion of some more wintry weather with snow on the hill, could return for a time next week.

Credits: Getty Images

"Gardeners and farmers take note - there's a continued risk of night time frosts."

A spokesman for the Met Office added: "Early May is likely to stay on the chilly side, with an ongoing risk of frost by night in a few places.

Credits: PA

"It may stay drier than average, but with a few short wetter and windier spells at times. During the first half of the month, temperatures are likely to rise gradually, returning to average and then perhaps above average.

Credits: Rex Features

"This will mean that we should lose the risk of frosts, and it will start to feel pleasantly warm in any sunshine by day.

"At this stage, it looks as though it will stay dry and settled most of the time."


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