British photographer captures incredible images from inside an Icelandic glacier

Mikael Buck shot never-before-seen photos inside the caves of Vatnajokull

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Wednesday 25th November 2015, Vatnaj�kull national park, Iceland: Photographer Mikael Buck with assistance from renowned local Icelandic guide Einar Runar Sigurdsson, explored the frozen world of Vatnaj�kull glacier in Iceland using Sony�s world first back-illuminated full-frame sensor � which features in the ?7R II camera. His images were taken without use of a tripod or any image stitching techniques in photoshop. This was made possible through Sony�s new sensor technology, allowing incredibly detailed low-light hand held photography. Previously images this detailed would have required carrying bulky equipment to the caves, some of which can require hiking and climbing over a glacier for up to two hours to to access.This picture: Inside the 'ABC cave' - which stands for Amazing Blue Cave.  Guide Einar Runar Sigurdsson is seen taking a photo at the entrance to the cavePR Handout - editorial usage only. Photographer's details not to be removed from metadata or byline.For further information please contact Rochelle Collison at Hope & Glory PR on 020 7014 5306 or rochelle.collison@hopeandglorypr.comCopyright: � Mikael Buck / Sony07828 201 042 / mikaelbuck@gmail.com

A British photographer has captured the natural beauty of Iceland's ice caves in a breathtaking new photo series.

Mikael Buck and top local guides Einar Runar Sigurdsson and Helen Maria explored the country's frozen world using Sony's latest digital cameras including the α7R II which features the world first back-illuminated full-frame sensor, bringing together ultra-high resolution and ultra-high sensitivity.

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The amazing images were taken in the caves of Vatnajokull, one of the largest glaciers in Europe, revealing its frozen, icy splendour through astoundingly sharp and detailed photography.

Wednesday 25th November 2015, Vatnaj�kull national park, Iceland: Photographer Mikael Buck with assistance from renowned local Icelandic guide Einar Runar Sigurdsson, explored the frozen world of Vatnaj�kull glacier in Iceland using Sony�s world first back-illuminated full-frame sensor � which features in the ?7R II camera. His images were taken without use of a tripod or any image stitching techniques in photoshop. This was made possible through Sony�s new sensor technology, allowing incredibly detailed low-light hand held photography. Previously images this detailed would have required carrying bulky equipment to the caves, some of which can require hiking and climbing over a glacier for up to two hours to to access.This picture: Inside the 'ABC cave' - which stands for Amazing Blue CavePR Handout - editorial usage only. Photographer's details not to be removed from metadata or byline.For further information please contact Rochelle Collison at Hope & Glory PR on 020 7014 5306 or rochelle.collison@hopeandglorypr.comCopyright: � Mikael Buck / Sony07828 201 042 / mikaelbuck@gmail.com

They were shot without the use of any external sources – just the natural light that filters through the ice caves.

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Bright blue and bubble-like walls resembling an almost underwater scene can be seen in the photo series. Flowing waterfalls, crystal-clear crevasses and icy tunnels were also pictured within the frosty fortress.

Wednesday 25th November 2015, Vatnaj�kull national park, Iceland: Photographer Mikael Buck with assistance from renowned local Icelandic guide Einar Runar Sigurdsson, explored the frozen world of Vatnaj�kull glacier in Iceland using Sony�s world first back-illuminated full-frame sensor � which features in the ?7R II camera. His images were taken without use of a tripod or any image stitching techniques in photoshop. This was made possible through Sony�s new sensor technology, allowing incredibly detailed low-light hand held photography. Previously images this detailed would have required carrying bulky equipment to the caves, some of which can require hiking and climbing over a glacier for up to two hours to to access.This picture: Looking up from inside the 'ABC cave' - which stands for Amazing Blue Cave.  Guide Einar Runar Sigurdsson can be seen ice climbing on the glacier outside.PR Handout - editorial usage only. Photographer's details not to be removed from metadata or byline.For further information please contact Rochelle Collison at Hope & Glory PR on 020 7014 5306 or rochelle.collison@hopeandglorypr.comCopyright: � Mikael Buck / Sony07828 201 042 / mikaelbuck@gmail.com

Buck's photos display the never-before-seen ice caverns in Vatnajokull, which was made possible through Sony's new sensor technology, allowing incredibly detailed low-light photography.

Each year, the Vatnajokull glacier shifts and changes, revealing complex cave systems that are there for only a matter of weeks before metamorphosing again.

Wednesday 25th November 2015, Vatnaj�kull national park, Iceland: Photographer Mikael Buck with assistance from renowned local Icelandic guide Einar Runar Sigurdsson, explored the frozen world of Vatnaj�kull glacier in Iceland using Sony�s world first back-illuminated full-frame sensor � which features in the ?7R II camera. His images were taken without use of a tripod or any image stitching techniques in photoshop. This was made possible through Sony�s new sensor technology, allowing incredibly detailed low-light hand held photography. Previously images this detailed would have required carrying bulky equipment to the caves, some of which can require hiking and climbing over a glacier for up to two hours to to access.This picture: Guide Einar Runar Sigurdsson is seen ice climbing inside the 'Waterfall Cave'PR Handout - editorial usage only. Photographer's details not to be removed from metadata or byline.For further information please contact Rochelle Collison at Hope & Glory PR on 020 7014 5306 or rochelle.collison@hopeandglorypr.comCopyright: � Mikael Buck / Sony07828 201 042 / mikaelbuck@gmail.com

Helen Maria of Local Guide, Iceland's oldest mountain guiding company, said: "I have been exploring these ice caves for years. Being here in them is a truly wonderful opportunity.

"Knowing you're experiencing such a fleeting phenomenon makes it even more special – the opportunity to help capture this nature in all its intricate glory is a truly magical experience.

Wednesday 25th November 2015, Vatnaj�kull national park, Iceland: Photographer Mikael Buck with assistance from renowned local Icelandic guide Einar Runar Sigurdsson, explored the frozen world of Vatnaj�kull glacier in Iceland using Sony�s world first back-illuminated full-frame sensor � which features in the ?7R II camera. His images were taken without use of a tripod or any image stitching techniques in photoshop. This was made possible through Sony�s new sensor technology, allowing incredibly detailed low-light hand held photography. Previously images this detailed would have required carrying bulky equipment to the caves, some of which can require hiking and climbing over a glacier for up to two hours to to access.This picture: Guide Einar Runar Sigurdsson is seen ice climbing inside the 'Waterfall Cave'PR Handout - editorial usage only. Photographer's details not to be removed from metadata or byline.For further information please contact Rochelle Collison at Hope & Glory PR on 020 7014 5306 or rochelle.collison@hopeandglorypr.comCopyright: � Mikael Buck / Sony07828 201 042 / mikaelbuck@gmail.com

"This series of photographs has done it justice like never before, and I hope many more people will be spurred on to visit as a result."

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