Collins says next season could be his last as Mets manager


Terry Collins, the oldest manager in Major League Baseball, could be approaching his final season.

The Mets' Collins, who will turn 68 next May, told on Thursday if next October he feels physically like he does now, it will be the end. 

"I just need to re-evaluate at the end of this coming year what's going on, where I am, how I'm feeling," Collins said.

"I've always said a lot of it will be dictated by how I'm feeling. This was a tough year."

Collins spent a night in the hospital in June after becoming ill before a game between the Mets and Brewers in Milwaukee.

The issue in that situation was not specified, but Collins says he is exhausted with big-league travel.

"It takes a toll on everybody. You talk to the players," Collins said.

"This travel is hard, especially with the late-night scheduling that is prevalent throughout baseball. There are so many night games where you're travelling after the game and getting into towns at three or four o'clock in the morning. And the next thing you know, if you ever have a day game pop up on you, it's tough to do."

Despite dealing with the stress of managing in New York and the multitude of injuries to his team, Collins says he feels a sense of accomplishment in leading the Mets to the postseason after being below .500 in August. 

"I think what we accomplished with all the injuries really took some tremendous character on the players' part and the coaches' and everybody else," Collins said.

"Getting to the World Series is really hard, as we all know, but from where we were in July to where we finished was pretty impressive."