United's 'Class of 92' part of Ferguson's 'slave army'


Manchester United's famed 'Class of '92' were part of Alex Ferguson's "slave army" but the legendary manager's style was beneficial to the team.

That is according to former United trainee Mads Timm, who spent six years at Old Trafford but made just one appearance as a substitute in a Champions League game.

United enjoyed a dominant era of success in English football during the 1990s with the likes of David Beckham, Ryan Giggs, Paul Scholes, the Neville brothers Gary and Phil, and Nicky Butt all graduating from the academy.

Ferguson was known for his no-nonsense style at Old Trafford and Timm questioned whether the Scot's methods would have the same affect in today's era.

"He implemented and insisted on a leadership culture and ruthlessly made sure his players dedicated themselves unconditionally to his ideas and hierarchy," Timm wrote in his autobiography 'Red Devil', which is being serialised in Danish newspaper BT.

"He was a control freak, and he often motivated players with fear.

"In his way, he was good for the time and fitted well to the players who were at United then.

"David Beckham, Ryan Giggs and the Neville brothers' [Gary and Phil] personalities all fitted perfectly into Ferguson's slave army.

"I am not sure he could create the same success in the same way today.

"Today you cannot get the footballers to subject themselves to talk about honour and willingness to die for the club.

"Today, most footballers know that team spirit is not greater than the contract."